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Economics and Business

Chair: Professor West
Professors: Leeds, Marabella; Associate Professors: Kaskowitz, L. Ravelle, Rossi, Vinciguerra; Assistant Professors: Aziz, Desiderio, Terrizzi; Special Appointment: Barnette; Faculty Associate: J. Ravelle (Sociology); Adjunct Faculty: Basile, Best, Klatchak.

The Department of Economics and Business offers majors in economics (theory and policy, finance), management (marketing, organizational leadership), accounting, international management, and environmental policy and economics. Students interested in business administration pursue the management major, choosing either the marketing track or organizational leadership (human resources) track. In addition to preparing students for graduate work, these majors provide a background valuable in a wide range of occupations in business, government, and nonprofit organizations. Typical positions are in banking, certified public accounting, finance and investment, marketing, production, business administration and human-resource management, as well as positions in federal, state, and local government, hospitals, social-service agencies, schools, and colleges.

  • The economics major, with tracks in theory and policy or finance, provides a good background for careers in business and government, work in business, economics, law, public administration, planning, and other professional disciplines.
  • The management major, with tracks in marketing and organizational leadership, provides a comprehensive background in the functional and environmental areas of business, including business administration, and serves as a foundation for graduate work in business and management.
  • The accounting major helps to prepare students for careers in public accounting, private industry, and non-profit organizations. It is also a good foundation for graduate study in accounting, management, finance, and law, as well as preparation examinations for professional certifications such as Certified Public Accountant, Certified Management Accountant, Certified Financial Management, and Certified Internal Auditor.
  • The international management major, offered in conjunction with the Foreign Languages Department, prepares students for careers in international business and administration.
  • The environmental policy and economics major, offered through the Environmental Sciences and Studies Program, provides students an opportunity to develop interdisciplinary approaches to environmental and social policy. The major prepares students for graduate study and for careers in business, private policy organizations, and government.

The Major in Economics

The economics curriculum provides a basic foundation in economic analysis and an understanding of economic institutions. Students choose one of two tracks: economic theory and policy or finance.

Both tracks require Economics 152, 156, 225, and 226. In addition, the track in economic theory and policy requires Economics 256 and five economics electives, including at least three at the 300-level and one writing-intensive course. The track in finance requires Accounting 157, Economics 231 (Writing-intensive), 220, 341; Management 223 or 226; and two of the following controlled electives: Economics 256, 335; Accounting 315; and Management 327. College-level algebra and calculus (Mathematics 106-166, 108, or 170) are required in the economics major.

Courses in economics are listed below.

The Minor in Economics

The minor in economics consists of five course units: Economics 152 plus four additional economics courses, three of which must be at the 200-level or above. Students cannot double-count courses in their major and minor, and should consult their advisor about course selection.

The Major in Management

The management curriculum provides a comprehensive background for professional positions in finance, marketing, human resources, and operations management.

Students choose one of three tracks: marketing, organizational leadership, or sports management. All three tracks require Accounting 157, Economics 152, 156, and 225; and Management 223. In addition, the track in marketing requires Management 251, 256, 311, 365, one of the following controlled electives: Management 227, 228, 250, or 333; and one free management elective. The track in organizational leadership also requires Management 253, 342, 365; three of the following controlled electives: Management 226, 227, 231, 251, 310, 324, or 333; (or another course approved by the advisor). The track in sports management requires Economics 312; Management 255, 286 or 386 and 365; Philosophy 228 or a course on sociology and sports (both are writing intensive); and a controlled elective, chosen from among the following: Management 231, 251, 253, 256, 311, 342, or sports psychology. College-level algebra and calculus (Mathematics 106-166, 108, or 170) are required in the management major.

Courses in management are listed below.

The Minor in Management

The minor in management consists of Economics 152, Management 223, and three full-unit management courses. Students cannot double-count courses in their major and minor, and should consult their advisor about course selection.

The Major in Accounting

The accounting curriculum is designed to provide a broad foundation in accounting to prepare students for careers in public accounting, private industry, and the non-profit sector.

Most states now require 150 credit hours of education to be completed before a candidate may be licensed as a CPA. Students can meet this requirement at Moravian College through early planning and careful course selection. One option is through admission to the five-year B.A./M.B.A. program. Students who elect this option will receive a B.A. at the conclusion of three and one-half years (seven full-time terms) of study and an M.B.A. on completion of the program in the fifth year.

The major in accounting consists of nine course units, including Economics 152, 156, and 225; Management 223; Accounting 157, 213, 218, 219, and 340; and two of the following controlled electives: Accounting 258, 315, 322, and 324. College-level algebra and calculus (Mathematics 108 or 170 or 106-166) are required for the accounting major.

Accounting courses are listed below.

The Minor in Accounting

The minor in accounting consists of five course units: Economics 152 and Accounting 157, 218, 219, and one additional course in accounting. Students cannot double-count courses in their major and minor, and should consult their advisor about course selection.

The Major in International Management (French/German/Spanish)

The major in international management is offered jointly by the Department of Economics and Business and the Department of Foreign Languages. International management majors take Accounting 157, Economics 152 and 236; Management 223 and 333; and one electives from Management 231, 251, or 253. Foreign language requirements include six courses above Foreign Language 105, including either Foreign Language 210 or 215 and Foreign Language 241 or equivalent, plus at least one 300-level course in the senior year. Students are encouraged to take Mathematics 107 or Economics 156 to satisfy their F2 LinC requirement in quantitative reasoning.

This program requires a semester abroad in which one business-related course and one foreign language course must be taken. All students interested in this major should consult with James P. West and Nilsa Lasso-von Lang (Spanish), Jean-Pierre Lalande (French), or Axel Hildebrandt (German). A student wishing to elect a major in international management with a language not listed should consult with Professor Lalande. 

There is no minor offered in international management.

The Major in Environmental Policy and Economics

The environmental policy and economics curriculum provides students with the necessary interdisciplinary approaches required to create and develop more efficient ways to protect and enhance the world's ecological and economic amenities. Sound foundational knowledge and problem-solving skills are developed so that graduates understand the complexity of environmental processes and the tradeoffs presented by alternative policies. The environmental policy and economics major consists of twelve course units. For details on course requirements and options, please refer to the section on Environmental Studies and Sciences.

Notes for Majors and Minors in Economics and Business

  • Students majoring in programs in the Department of Economics and Business are expected to be computer-literate and acquainted with applications in word-processing, spreadsheets, and statistical analysis.
  • Algebra and calculus are required in the economics, management, and accounting majors. The algebra requirement ordinarily is met by the completion of three years of secondary mathematics; the calculus requirement by taking Mathematics 108 or 170 (or its equivalent sequence, Mathematics 106-166).
  • Transfer students may satisfy the calculus prerequisite through courses taken at other institutions on approval of the Economics and Business Department chair. Students are advised that such courses might not satisfy the College's F2 requirement.
  • Mathematics 107 may be substituted for Economics 156 in the major or minor in economics, management, international management, or accounting; but those students who have taken or are taking concurrently Mathematics 107, 231, or 332 will not receive credit for Economics 156. Students intending graduate work in economics are encouraged strongly to take Mathematics 171 and 220.
  • Majors in economics, management, international management, or accounting are urged to develop a significant concentration in some other area, whether it be mathematics, a natural science, one of the humanities, a foreign language, or another behavioral science.
  • Economics 152 will satisfy the M4 Learning in Common requirement in Economic, Social, and Political Systems.
  • All students majoring in the department must enroll in one writing-intensive course within their major.
  • Students may major in one field in the department and minor in another but may not double-count courses (i.e., count a single course towards both the major and the minor). Students should consult their advisor or the chair regarding acceptable substitute courses.
  • Students may not double-major within the department.
  • Majors in this department may not take any full-unit courses in the department on a pass/no credit basis.
  • The department recognizes self-designed and interdisciplinary majors and minors and conforms to College policy with regard to their requirements. Advisors should consult the most recent edition of this catalog for requirements and more information.
  • Challenges to all course prerequisites must be approved by the department chair.

The Interdepartmental Major

The six courses of Set I include Economics 152 and 156, Accounting 157, and three other courses in economics, accounting, or management. These three elective courses and the six courses of Set II are selected by the student with the approval of the advisor.

The M.B.A. Program

Through the Comenius Center for Continuing, Professional, and Graduate Studies and the Economics and Business Department, Moravian College offers the Moravian M.B.A., a program leading to the master's degree in business administration. The first part of the M.B.A. curriculum consists of business competency courses offered regularly as a part of the undergraduate curriculum in economics and business. These courses or their equivalent taken at another institution may satisfy all or part of the prerequisite requirements in the M.B.A. program.

The second part of the M.B.A. includes advanced theoretical and applied courses in management, marketing, law, finance, accounting, and economics. Further information about the M.B.A. program is available from Lizabeth Kleintop, associate dean for business and management programs, Comenius Center for Continuing, Professional, and Graduate Studies.

The Five-Year Combined Degree Programs

The Economics and Business Department and the Comenius Center offer opportunities to students interested in earning both a bachelor’s degree in any major and a master’s degree in either business administration (M.B.A.) or human resource management (M.S.H.R.M.) through a combined, five-year program. Consult the Economics and Business Department Chair or Lizabeth Kleintop, associate dean for business and management programs in the Comenius Center.

Courses in Economics

152. Principles of Economics. Study of basic economic theory and major economic institutions, including the development of economic thought. Emphasis on structure, functions, and underlying principles of modern economic life. Includes elementary macro- and microeconomic theory. Prerequisite: Three years of secondary mathematics through college-level algebra or consent of instructor. Fall & Spring. (M4)
Aziz, Leeds, L. Ravelle, Terrizzi, West

156. Economic and Business Statistics. Introduction to statistical concepts and methods. This course reviews descriptive measures of location and dispersion, provides an overview of probability concepts and distributions, and focuses on statistical inference, hypothesis testing, and simple and multiple linear regression analysis. Additional topics may include quality control and time series analysis. Economics 156 may not be taken for credit by students who have earned credit for Mathematics 107 or 231. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and three years of secondary mathematics through college-level algebra or consent of instructor. Fall & Spring. (F2)
Aziz, Leeds, L. Ravelle, Terrizzi

210. The Economics of Crime. Does crime pay? Of course! How crime and criminals are dealt with in tribal and non-Western societies; considerations of crime by political scientists, psychologists, sociologists, and economists; recommendations for controlling crime. Topics include crimes of theft and violence, white-collar crime, capital punishment. Open to all students with sophomore or higher standing. Counts as an elective for economics majors. Writing-intensive.
Staff

211. The Economics of Health and Health Care. Human health, national and personal, from an economic perspective. Expenditures on health are a primary determinant of quality of life. In the United States and in many other countries in the developed world, health-care expenditures are rising faster than consumer income. Thus, understanding the economics of health is important, especially given the increasingly complex ways in which health-care services are delivered. Topics include the value of health from an individual and societal perspective; demand for physicians and other health services; supply of health care; insurance; international comparison of health expenditure and the role of government. May be counted as an elective for the economics major or minor. Prerequisite: junior or senior class standing, and Economics 152 or permission of instructor. Spring. (U1)
Aziz, Terrizzi

216. Information Systems for Management. Management needs involving information systems have increased in importance and range. Explore the role of information technology in an organization and its impact on the business environment. Understand the importance of using information systems as a tool for managing. Topics include impact of information technology on organizations, ethical and security challenges, technical foundations of hardware/software, management of data, e-Business/e-Commerce, business IT strategies, telecommunications, and networking. Prerequisite: Management 211.2 or permission of the instructor.
Terrizzi

220. Money, Banking, and Financial Policy. History and theory of money, banking and financial markets: commercial banking and bank management; money and capital markets; financial innovation and regulation. Central banking, monetary theory and policy and international monetary issues are covered. A critical examination of current monetary and regulatory policies to maintain economic stability, economic growth, and other goals. Prerequisite: Economics 152. Fall.
Leeds, Terrizzi, West

225. Intermediate Microeconomics. Theory of production; market structures; equilibrium of the firm and the industry; pricing of factors of production; analysis of consumer behavior; general equilibrium analysis; welfare economics. Prerequisites: Economics 152 and 156, college-level calculus (Mathematics 108, 170, or 106-166), and sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.
Aziz, Leeds, Terrizzi

226. Intermediate Macroeconomics. Macroeconomic theory and policy. Development and historical background of a unified macroeconomic model to explain the national income, inflation, and unemployment; economic growth. Analysis of current domestic and international economic events. Sophomore standing or instructor permission. Prerequisite: Economics 152 and 156.
Leeds, L. Ravelle, West

228. Economic Development. An integrative approach to theories and challenges of economic development in developing countries. Topics include population growth, education and health, capital formation and technology, socio-cultural foundations of development, trade, and the role of domestic and international institutions, especially the World Bank. Case studies are used from around the world. Prerequisite: Economics 152. Alternate years Spring.
Leeds, West

231. Managerial Finance. (Also Management 231) Relevant theories of financial management of business organizations, with emphasis on corporate form. Combines theoretical and environmental frames of reference to determine how firms maximize value. Topics include real and financial-asset valuation, risk and rates of return, cost of capital, portfolio choice, and long- and short-term financing decisions. Prerequisites: Economics 152 and 156, Accounting 157.
Leeds, L. Ravelle

236. International Economics. Theories and policies of international trade and finance. Balance of payments, exchange-rate determination, free trade and protectionism, evolution of international economic institutions, contemporary issues. Prerequisites: Economics 152. Fall.
Leeds, West

240. Environmental Economics and Policy. This course explores theories of externalities and public goods as applied to pollution and environmental policy. Trade-offs between production and environmental amenities and assessment of non-market value of environmental amenities. Topics include remediation and clean-up policies, development, and biodiversity management. Prerequisite: Economics 152. Spring.
Aziz

241. Natural Resource Economics and Policy. This course introduces the economic dimensions of environmental and energy issues. Use of economic models to approach energy and environmental issues in a way that leads to socially responsible and economically sound policy. Specific applications include fisheries, oil and gas reserves, and wildlife management. Prerequisite: Economics 152. Fall.
Aziz

256. Applied Econometrics. (Also Management 256) An introduction to regression-based modeling as applied to economic, management, marketing, and other business-related examples. Emphasis is on how to use econometrics to inform decision-making: to formulate, model, and interpret results of real-world problems based on data. In addition to learning various modeling techniques, the course focuses on often encountered data problems such as multicollinearity and serial correlation of errors. As an applied course, there is significant emphasis on correct specification of models and interpretation of results. Students will learn to use econometric software to estimate models and detect and address common challenges inherent in data. Prerequisites: Economics 152 and 156.
Aziz, Leeds, Terrizzi

312. The Economics of Sports. This course applies economic theory to a variety of amateur and professional sports, including baseball, hockey, football, basketball, soccer, and golf. Principal areas of interest are labor, markets, industrial organization, and public finance. Topics for discussion: unions and strike behavior, the monopoly power of leagues, the baseball antitrust exemption, the effect of free agency on competitive balance and player salaries, and the funding of stadiums. Prerequisite: Economics 225. Alternate years Spring.
Leeds

325. History of Economic Thought. Development of classical and neoclassical or marginalist economic theory. Works by Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall, John Maynard Keynes, others. Prerequisite: Economics 152 and one 200-level Economics course. Writing-intensive. Alternate years Spring.
Leeds, West

327. Industrial Organization. This course applies economic theory to the pricing practices of firms under varying degrees of competition. Analysis covers different industries and also firms’ decisions regarding quality, advertising and other business choices. Topics include: technological innovation, the role of information and advertising, and the dynamics of oligopoly and monopoly pricing. Prerequisites: Economics 152, 156, and 225. Alternate years Fall.
Terrizzi

329. Labor Economics. Analysis of supply and demand for human resources, functioning of labor markets and labor institutions. Topics include discrimination, unionism and collective bargaining, macroeconomic aspects of employment, unemployment, wage levels. Prerequisites: Economics 152 and 225. Alternate years. Writing-intensive.
Staff

330. Public Finance. Public sector of the economy and economic welfare. Institutions and financing of the public sector. Nature of public goods, theory of public choice, principles of expenditure and tax analysis, the welfare effects of specific programs such as medical care, social security, unemployment insurance and food stamps, taxes on income, sales, social security, and property. State and local government finance. Prerequisites: Economics 152 and 225. Alternate years. Writing-intensive. Fall.
L. Ravelle

335. Current Topics in Finance. Assesses contemporary issues in financial markets and institutions, corporate finance, investments, and the global economy. Topics will vary and be chosen to reflect the dynamic and often revolutionary nature of financial markets in a globalizing and technologically sophisticated environment. The regulatory and ethical environment of finance will be included among the issues studied. This course is designed for upper-level economics-finance majors as well as others with appropriate course background and interest, with approval of the instructor. The course will also serve as one of the controlled electives in the economics-finance track. Prerequisites: Economics 225. Recommended: Economics 220.
Staff

341. Investment and Portfolio Theory. (Also Management 341) Principles underlying investment analysis and policy; salient characteristics of governmental and corporate securities; policies of investment companies and investing institutions; relation of investment policy to money markets; forces affecting securities prices; construction of personal and institutional investment programs. Determination of investment values, portfolio analysis, optimal investment planning. Securities and Exchange Commission regulations. Prerequisite: Economics/Management 231. Spring.
Leeds, L. Ravelle

342.1. Amrhein Investment Fund. Management of the Amrhein Investment Fund, with a maximum of one full unit of credit given over a two-year period if specific academic requirements are met. Pass/no credit only.
L. Ravelle

190-199, 290-299, 390-399. Special Topics.

286, 381-384. Independent Study.

288, 386-388. Internship.

400-401. Honors.

Courses in Management

211.2. Applied Information Management. Problems of organizing and managing data for use by managers, economists, and social scientists, or anyone who must keep track of information. Basics of information systems: what they are, how to design them, how they are used; and two computer tools used to manage them: spreadsheets and databases. Web research and usage.
Klatchak, Staff

223. Management and Organizational Theory. Presentation of foundational knowledge of the management processes of planning, leading, organizing and control, along with study of classic and emerging organizational theory. Management roles, functions, competencies and practice are studied in businesses and not-for profit organizations and grounded in business ethics, multiculturalism, and quality in the global business environment. Prerequisite: Economics 152.
Desiderio, Marabella

226. Legal Environment of Business. (Also Sociology 226) Legal principles related to conduct of business and industry. Topics of analysis include contracts, sales, agency, business organizations, partnerships, corporations, pass-through entities, unfair competition, and cyberlaw.
J. Ravelle

227. Consumer Behavior. Psychology of consumers. Methods of psychological research for problems in consumer areas. Impact of personality, learning, motivation, and perception on consumer decisions. Topics include consumer stereotypes, social groups as consumers, advertising, product or brand images and identification, and attitude change in consumers. Recommended: Management 251. Fall.
Kaskowitz

228. Telling and Selling Your Brand: The Art of the Story. (Also Interdisciplinary 228) Explores the use of mythology, archetypes, and storytelling to create a cohesive and compelling identity for an organization. Focus on how legendary organizations have built trust and created iconic brands by understanding and applying these principles. The use of symbolism (visual and mental) and metaphor to create a theme that is enduring, powerful, and integrated throughout the organization. Explore ways that organizations and people can develop deep and lasting relationships with their customers and other stakeholders through the understanding and application of these storytelling techniques. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Kaskowitz

231. Managerial Finance. (Also Economics 231) Theories of financial management of business organizations, with emphasis on corporate form. Combines theoretical and environmental frames of reference to determine how firms maximize value. Real and financial asset valuation, risk and rate of return, cost of capital, portfolio choice, long- and short-term financing decisions. Prerequisites: Economics 152 and 156, Accounting 157.
Leeds, L. Ravelle

250. Moral Marketing - Serving the World's Poor. (Also Interdisciplinary 250) How the ideas of tzedek ("justice") and charity ("love") apply to marketing to the world's poorest people (those living on less than $2 a day). Examination of three different perspectives of social justice: Jewish, Christian, and American secular traditions. Each of these three perspectives has unique traditions regarding the role of the individual and the community, and the obligation towards helping those less fortunate. Discussion of differences between morality and ethics based on these three perspectives, as well as approaches to social justice as an obligation, an act of love, or a practical solution. Discuss needs of the poor in emerging nations and how products could be created and distributed in these emerging nations in accordance with these different ethical and moral perspectives. (U2) Prerequisite: junior or senior class standing.         
Kaskowitz

251. Marketing Management. The role of marketing activities in management of an organization. Emphasis on application of marketing principles to design and implement effective programs for marketing products and services to consumers and industrial users. Market analysis and buyer behavior in the development of appropriate product, pricing, distribution, and promotional strategies. Prerequisite: Economics 152 or permission of instructor.
Kaskowitz

253. Human Resource Management. Employee motivation, recruitment and selection, performance evaluation, training and development, compensation and benefit plans, intra-organizational communication. Emphasis on case studies to develop problem-solving and decision-making abilities; operational practices; relevant behavioral- science theories; public policy and institutional constraints on effective use of human resources. Prerequisite: Management 223 or permission of instructor.
Desiderio

255. Mindfulness in Sport. Using Csikszentmihalyi’s theory of flow as the theoretical framework to guide this course, we will explore mindfulness and flow in the context of optimizing performance in sports organizations. Together, we will discover how leaders make meaning of their behaviors in the context of doing good business in the sports industry. We will explore ways of thinking, reactions to our readings, self-reflection, and how to express responses in an analytical and thoughtful way. In an effort to create awareness for happiness at work, we must understand the cultural implications that stimulate our lives. Using a sports management lens, let’s explore how “… leaders and managers of any organization can learn to contribute to the sum of human happiness, to the development of an enjoyable life that provides meaning, and to a society that is just and evolving” (Csikszentmihalyi, p. 5, 2003). Prerequisite: Management 223.
Desiderio

256. Applied Econometrics. (Also Economics 256) An introduction to regression-based modeling as applied to economic, management, marketing, and other business-related examples. Emphasis is on how to use econometrics to inform decision-making: to formulate, model, and interpret results of real-world problems based on data. In addition to learning various modeling techniques, the course focuses on often encountered data problems such as multicollinearity and serial correlation of errors. As an applied course, there is significant emphasis on correct specification of models and interpretation of results. Students will learn to use econometric software to estimate models and detect and address common challenges inherent in data. Prerequisites: Economics 152 and 156.
Aziz, Leeds

310. "Doing Good" at Work. (Also Interdisciplinary 310) "Doing good" is philanthropy, ethical codes of conduct, voluntarism, social responsibility, and environmental stewardship. "Doing good" at work is not only the morally correct thing to do for the individual employee, but the more individuals in the organization who "do good," the more likely the organization will succeed on economic, social, and mission-related levels/goals. Students will learn about the philosophy, history and practice of "doing good" at work, and integrate what they have learned and what they believe to develop their own model for "doing good" that they can work and "live with." Prerequisite: junior or senior class standing. (U2) 
Marabella

311. Marketing Research. Methods of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to aid marketing managers in identifying market problems and opportunities and to develop effective marketing strategies. Prerequisites: Economics 156 and Management 251. Writing-intensive. Spring.
Kaskowitz

324. Operations Management. Introduction to managing the supply side of profit and not-for-profit organizations, and their production of goods and services. Includes process improvement, scheduling, materials management, and quantitative methods for operations management. Prerequisites: Economics 156 and two of the following: Accounting 213, Management 231, 251, 253. Spring.
Staff

327. Legal Environment of Finance and Credit. Aspects of legal environment of financial and thrift institutions. Application of Uniform Commercial Code to commercial paper, deposits and collections, investments, and secured transactions. Consumer credit transactions, mortgages and realty, trusts and estates. Prerequisite: Accounting 157. Alternate years.
J. Ravelle

333. International Issues in Management. Issues in international business and management from a world-system perspective; development of management as it influences and is influenced by multinational network of organizations, governments, and business enterprises. Theory and practice of global management, requiring perspective compatible with changing nature of international relations. Prerequisite: Management 223 or permission of instructor. Alternate years.
West, Marabella

341. Investment and Portfolio Theory. (Also Economics 341) Principles underlying investment analysis and policy; salient characteristics of governmental and corporate securities; policies of investment companies and investing institutions; relation of investment policy to money markets; forces affecting securities prices; construction of personal and institutional investment programs. Determination of investment values, portfolio analysis, optimal investment planning. Securities and Exchange Commission regulations. Prerequisite: Economics/Management 231. Spring.
Leeds, L. Ravelle

342. Organizational Behavior and Leadership. Examines the relationship between the individual and the organization. Topics to be considered include communication motivation, leadership and power, group dynamics and decision-making, interpersonal relationships and change. Theories and practice of leadership will be studied in depth. Various pedagogical techniques will be utilized including lectures, case studies, examination of research and experiential learning. Prerequisites: Management 223 and 253. Writing-intensive. 
Desiderio

365. Management Strategy and Policy. Seminar for senior management majors, incorporating principles and practices of marketing, production/operations, economics, finance, human resources, accounting, and planning, and applying them to the development, administration, and evaluation of management strategies and policies at the corporate, business, and functional levels. Prerequisites: Management 223, senior standing. Spring.
Marabella

190-199, 290-299, 390-399. Special Topics.

286, 381-384. Independent Study.

288, 386-388. Internship.

400-401. Honors.

Courses in Accounting

157. Financial Accounting. Introduction to accounting, the language of business. This course provides an introduction to financial reporting. Topics include reporting of business transactions, application of accounting theory, standards, and principles, and analysis of financial information.
Rossi, Vinciguerra

213. Cost Accounting. An introduction to basic financial information used within business organizations. Emphasis on cost analysis to improve decision making and facilitate planning and control. Topics include cost systems, budgeting, variance analysis, and pricing and profit analysis. Prerequisites: Accounting 157 and Economics 156.
Vinciguerra

218. Intermediate Accounting I. Environment and theoretical structure of financial accounting, including income statements and statements of cash-flows, income measurement, the balance sheet, financial disclosures, time value of money concepts, cash and receivables, inventories, operational assets, investments. Application of accounting and economic concepts to analysis of a company's financial position and performance, as shown in published information, primarily financial statements. Prerequisite: Accounting 157. Fall.
Rossi

219. Intermediate Accounting II. Continuation of Accounting 218. Topics include liabilities, contingencies, stockholders' equity, dilutive securities, earnings per share, investment, revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions, post-retirement benefits, leases, accounting changes and error correction, statement of cash-flows, financial statement analysis, full disclosure. Prerequisite: Accounting 218 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor. Spring.
Rossi

258. Computers and Accounting Information Systems. Introduction to hardware, software, networks, databases. Developing information strategy, organizing reporting needs, setting up accounting systems. Discussion of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP). Prerequisites: Accounting 157 and Management 211.2 or equivalent experience.
Staff, Klatchak

315. Federal Income Tax. Personal tax concepts, structure, and planning, including rules of taxation that influence personal or business decisions. An understanding of our federal tax system is required to succeed in such professions as public accounting, banking, investment management, and auditing, as well as other occupations that involve decision-making. Prerequisite: Accounting 157. Fall.
Rossi

322. Advanced Accounting. A comprehensive study of the equity and cost methods of accounting for investments in common stock and business combinations, including consolidated financial statements. Special topics such as accounting for partnerships, segment and interim reporting, foreign currency, and international accounting issues, including global accounting standards and diversity. Prerequisite: Accounting 218 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor
Rossi

324. Auditing. An introduction to the practice and profession of auditing. Major topics include audit responsibilities and objectives, audit planning, evidence accumulation, materiality and risk, internal control, audit reports, professional ethics, and legal liability. Prerequisites: Accounting 218 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor.
Vinciguerra

340. Senior Seminar in Accounting. A capstone course related to financial reporting and hot accounting issues. Emphasis on understanding conceptual issues about financial reporting; such as international accounting standards and ethical issues as they relate to the profession. Understanding how business choices and ethical decisions affect financial statements and user perspectives; researching a company's financial statements, press releases, and news reports. Materials include case studies of actual companies. Prerequisite: Accounting 218 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor. Writing-intensive.
Rossi, Vinciguerra

351.2. Not-for-Profit-Sector Accounting. Issues of financial reporting, managerial, taxation, and information systems in not-for-profit organizations. Principles and practices of nonprofit accounting, ethics and professional standards, measurement of efficiency and economical use of resources to satisfy legal, reporting, and societal requirements. Emphasis on writing, speaking, critical thinking, and analytical skills. Prerequisite: Accounting 157 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor. Spring.
Basile, Staff

352.2. Tax Planning for Business Entities. Fundamentals of individual and business income taxation, tax implications of various types of business entities, planning for acquisition and disposition of property, tax-advantaged investments, financial planning. Topics include employee compensation, conduit entities, corporations, and estates and trusts. Tax research and practitioner concerns. Prerequisites: Accounting 157 and 315 or equivalent experience.
Basile, Rossi

190-199, 290-299, 390-399. Special Topics.

286, 381-384. Independent Study.

288, 386-388. Internship.

400-401. Honors.