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Education

Chair: Professor Shosh
Associate Professor: DesJardin; Assistant Professor: Gleason; Faculty Associates: Baxter (art), Kuserk (biological sciences); Reid (English); McKeown (world languages); Paxton (history); Hartshorn (mathematics); Hirokawa (music); Krieble (physics, general science); Adjunct Faculty: Aragona-Young, Bilheimer, Colon, Conard, Correll, Dilendik, Donaher, C. Evans, T. Evans, Finlay, Frey, Fuini-Hetten, Goldberg, Grove, Hogan, Jacoby, Ketterman-Benner, Mancino, Massey, Resende, Richmond, Sillivan, Torok, VanDoren, Villani, Ziegenfuss; Director of Field Experiences: Modjadidi.

Moravian College offers programs to prepare and certify students for careers in teaching from pre-K to grade 12. The College believes that a teacher is best prepared through a program that integrates the principles of liberal education with concentrations of study in an academic discipline and in teaching, combined with extensive field experience in the schools.

Moravian offers programs leading to Pennsylvania public school teacher certification in art (grades K-12), early childhood education (pre-K - grade 4), middle level education (grades 4-8), four world languages (French, German, Spanish, and Latin, grades preK-12), music (grades preK-12), special education, English as a Second Language, and eight secondary education (grades 7-12) subject areas: biology, chemistry, citizenship education, English, general science, mathematics, physics, and social studies. The Education Department’s Master of Education program also offers certification for ESL program specialists, reading specialists, principals, supervisors of curriculum and instruction, and special education. The Master of Arts in Teaching program offers initial licensure and advance study at the graduate level.

Admission to the Program

Acceptance to Moravian College does not guarantee that a student will be accepted into the teacher certification program. There is a two-step process for admission into this program. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Step 1 by the end of the sophomore year.

Step 1. For initial admission to the program, students must have:

  • 48 credit hours (12 course units).
  • A 2.8 GPA.
  • 6 credit hours (1.5 units) of college-level mathematics. (These credits may be part of the initial 48 credits, and one unit can be met by the Learning in Common F2 requirement.)
  • 3 credit hours in English composition and 3 credit hours in English literature. (These credits may be part of the 48 initial credits and can be met by the Writing 100 course or the First Year Seminar and the LinC M2 requirement.)
  • A passing score on the PAPA (Pre-professional Academic Performance Assessment) in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics.
  • A successful stage 1 & 2 early field experience evaluation.
  • U.S. citizenship or a declared intent to file for U.S. citizenship. (This requirement is mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and applies to teachers of all subjects except world languages.)

Step 2. Students who intend to obtain teaching certification must make a formal application to the Teacher Education Committee. Applications must be submitted two semesters prior to the student-teaching semester, i.e., for fall student teaching, by December 1 of the preceding year; for spring student teaching, by April 15 of the preceding year. The committee approves applications on the basis of these criteria:

  • Scholarship. Students must achieve all the following for admission to student teaching:
       3.0 overall GPA
       3.0 GPA in the academic major
       3.0 GPA in the professional education sequence
  • Recommendation of the major department based upon the mastery of content knowledge in the academic discipline.
  • Recommendation of the Education Department based on the mastery of pedagogical content knowledge and performance in successful stage 1 & 2 early field and stage 3 pre-student teaching experiences.
  • Evidence of professional attitude and behavior will be considered in light of field experience evaluations, College faculty and staff assessment, disciplinary information from the Student Affairs Office, and other sources. Submission of a signed application to the Teacher Certification program is required and shall constitute consent for the Student Affairs Office to release all such information on file to the Teacher Education Committee.

After approval by the Teacher Education Committee, a student is expected to maintain minimum averages and continue to receive endorsements of the departments and offices involved. A student must meet all standards and complete prerequisite coursework prior to the student-teaching semester.

A student who has been denied admission to the program may reapply at a later time if criteria for student teaching have been met. In such circumstances, completion of certification requirements may involve extending the student's program if the requirements cannot otherwise be met. A student who wishes to challenge an action by the Teacher Education Committee may request a hearing and personal appearance before the committee. If not satisfied by the hearing, he or she may appeal to the Office of the Provost.

Assignment of Advisors

All students interested in teacher certification should meet with the appropriate Education Department advisor.

  • Early Childhood. Once the student has identified his or her primary major, a Declaration of Major form may be submitted to the registrar. Early childhood education certification candidates have two advisors. The primary advisor is a faculty member from the academic major; the secondary advisor is Jean DesJardin in the Education Department. Students will meet with their academic advisor as well as their Early Childhood advisor before registering for courses.
  • Middle Level. Once the student has identified his or her primary major, a Declaration of Major form may be submitted to the registrar. Middle-level certification candidates have two advisors. The primary advisor is Joseph M. Shosh of the Education Department. Students will meet with both advisors each semester before registering for courses.
  • Secondary. Students interested in secondary certification should meet with an advisor early—in the freshman year, if possible. Once the student has identified his or her primary major and submitted a Declaration of Major form to the registrar, the student should consult with his or her advisor in the Education Department. (The education advisor is the student's secondary advisor; the primary advisor is a faculty member from his or her academic major.) The Education Department secondary education advisor is Joseph M. Shosh. After the initial consultation, students should seek out the education advisors each semester before registering for courses.
  • Art. Students interested in art certification should meet with Kristin Baxter in the Art Department
  • Music. Students interested in music certification should meet with Joy Hirokawa in the Music Department each semester before registering for courses.
  • Transfer students should arrange an appointment with the assistant dean for academic advising following their interview with the Admissions Office. Completed coursework, total Moravian equivalency units, and the criteria listed on the preceding pages will determine placement in the professional sequence.

Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Required Testing for Teacher Certification

The Pennsylvania Educator Certification Tests (PECT)

Students in all Pennsylvania Instructional I teacher certification programs must successfully complete basic skills assessments in reading, mathematics and writing. Currently there are two testing options. You may take either the Pearson PECT Pre- service Academic Performance Assessment (PAPA) or the ETS Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators (CORE) exams. Please consult test provider websites for additional information regarding test content, testing locations and registration procedures. See: http://www.pa.nesinc.com, select ‘tests’, then ‘PAPA’ and/or https://www.ets.org/praxis/about/core/.

Students may qualify for exemption from the basic skills assessment exams based on their SAT or ACT scores. Please contact the Education Department regarding exemptions and other test related questions you may have.

Candidates are encouraged to take the PAPA or CORE exams prior to or during the sophomore year. If not exempt, all teacher certification candidates will be required to pass these tests prior to admission into the teacher certification program and participation in any Stage 3 Field Experiences.

Content Area Exams

Early Childhood Candidates must also take The PreK–4 assessment which includes three modules. Examinees must take and pass all three modules to qualify for Pennsylvania teacher certification. Students are encouraged to print out the full-length practice test on the website to familiarize themselves with the testing format. Additional information is available at https://www.pa.nesinc.com/TestView.aspx?f=HTML_FRAG/PA006_TestPage.html. Candidates applying for certification in art, music or world language (K-12 programs) must pass the Praxis II Fundamental Subjects: Content Knowledge test and the appropriate Praxis II subject test prior to being granted certification. Information on these tests is available at the Educational testing Service website: http://www.ets.org/praxis/pa/requirements.

Middle Level Candidates must pass the Pennsylvania Grades 4-8 Core Assessment: Pedagogy, English Language Arts and Social Studies, Mathematics and Science test prior to being granted certification. In addition, they must pass the appropriate Middle Level Subject Concentration (Citizenship Education 4-8, English 4-8, Mathematics 4-8, or Science 4-8) test(s). For complete information, see the Educational testing Service website: http://www.ets.org/praxis/pa/requirements.

Secondary Candidates must pass the appropriate Praxis II Content Knowledge Test prior to being certified. For complete information, see the Educational testing Service website: http://www.ets.org/praxis/pa/requirements.

Secondary, middle level, art, and music education students are strongly encouraged to take the academic content test after they have completed the majority of courses for their major, generally in the fall of the senior year, but before student teaching in the spring term.

The Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) periodically revises testing requirements. Students should consult regularly with their Education Department advisor and the Pennsylvania Department of Education website for updates from PDE: http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/testing_requirements/

Because the Moravian College Education Department must approve every student's certification, it is necessary to have test scores sent to the College. This is done on the examination's registration form.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania awards certification to candidates who have passed the required tests and who have been recommended by educational institutions with accredited, state-approved programs.

Field Experience

The purpose of the field experience is to provide students with appropriate classroom experiences at each level of their coursework. These experiences are meant to assist the student in determining whether teaching is an appropriate career choice. For those who decide to pursue teacher certification, field experiences will progress from stage 1 & 2 field experiences to stage 3 pre-student teaching to stage 4 student teaching. All field experience is directly related to material presented in the sequence of education courses. The Education Department's director of field experiences is responsible for securing all field placements. Students are required to secure their own transportation to and from field experience placements.

Cooperating teachers for field experiences hold appropriate certification and are selected for their willingness and ability to mentor, their excellence in teaching, their knowledge of teaching practice, and their devotion to the teaching profession. The cooperating teacher for any field experience provides a valuable opportunity for students to observe a teaching professional and participate in a classroom setting.

Students will not be permitted to enroll in a course that includes a field experience until all completed forms required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education have been presented to the College's director of field experiences. These clearance documents include the FBI Federal Criminal History Record (Act 114), the Pennsylvania State Police Criminal Record Check (Act 34), and the Pennsylvania Child Abuse History Clearance (Act 151). Some of these forms take six to eight weeks for completion, so students need to plan accordingly. Students who need to update their clearances or obtain initial clearances must personally bring all original clearance documents to the Education Department to be reviewed and copied before they will be permitted to register for education courses with field experiences. Photocopies, faxes, and scanned documents are unacceptable. Please note that the last opportunity to add a course is by 4:00 P.M. on the last day of the drop/add period. The clearance documents must be valid for the entire academic semester the student is in a field experience. Students will be placed in field experiences only when all background checks indicate that no record exists. Information concerning how to obtain and submit these forms is available in the Education Department and on the Education Department website at http://home.moravian.edu/public/educ/eddept/placements.htm. In addition, the Pennsylvania Department of education requires that all students participating in a field experience complete an Act 24 (Arrest/Conviction Report and Certification Form).

Students in field placements must be tested for tuberculosis. An acceptable test must be administered not more than three months before the first day of any field experience. A form indicating negative results of the test must be signed by a nurse or physician and submitted to the Education Department prior to beginning a field experience. Students will not be allowed to start a field experience until all required documents have been reviewed and copied. Students should contact Camie Modjadidi, Director of Field Experiences, if they have questions regarding field experience.

Stages 1 and 2 Field Experience: Observation and Exploration

The first level in the field-experience continuum is an opportunity for the student to become familiar with classroom teaching and responsibilities under extensive support and direction. The student is required to complete a minimum of 40 hours for each experience. This experience is the field component for the following courses:

   Education 130 Student Development and Instructional Design. Required for all art, music, middle level (grades 4-8), world language (K-12), and secondary education candidates.
   Education 160 Culture, Community, and Diversity: Introduction to Critical Pedagogy. Required for all education certification candidates.
   Education 210 Child Development 1. Required for all early childhood candidates.
   Education 211 Child Development 2. Required for all early childhood candidates.
   Education 222 Emerging Language and Literacy, Pre-K to 4th Grade. Required for all early childhood certification candidates

Stage 3 Pre-Student-Teaching Experience

This is an opportunity for the student, before student teaching, to experience daily classroom activities as well and take responsibility for the planning and presentation of lessons. All certification candidates are required to complete a minimum of 150 hours. Pre-student-teaching is the field component for the following courses:

Early Childhood and Middle Level Education

   Education 358.2 Pre-Student Teaching. Required for all early childhood and middle level candidates. Part 1 taken along with EDUC 312, Data Driven Analysis Research, EDUC 323, Scientific Reasoning and EDUC 324, Social Studies or EDUC 331, Science for Middle Level Learners and EDUC 330, Social Studies for Middle Level learners. (75 hours)
   Education 359.2 Pre-Student Teaching. Required for all early childhood and middle level candidates. Part 2 taken along with EDUC 321,Language Arts for Children, Pre-K to 4th Grade and EDUC 322, Math Thinking or EDUC 333, Literacy for Middle Level Learners and EDUC 332, Math for Middle Level Learners. (75 hours)

Secondary and World Language K-12 Education

   Education 260 Reflective Teaching in Secondary Schools. (40 hours)
   Education 360 Curriculum and Instruction in English (110 hours)
   Education 361 Curriculum and Instruction in World Language (110 hours)
   Education 362 Curriculum and Instruction in Mathematics (110 hours)
   Education 364 Curriculum and Instruction in Science (110 hours)
   Education 365 Curriculum and Instruction in Social Science (110 hours)
Art Education
   Education 366 Curriculum and Instruction in Art (150 hours)
Music Education
   Education 367 Teaching Music to Children. (75 hours)
   Education 368 Teaching Music to Adolescents and Adults. (75 hours)

Stage 4 Student Teaching Experience

Student teaching is the culminating experience of the teacher-preparation program. Its purpose is to help the student develop into a competent professional. Student teaching is physically and psychologically exhausting, but it is also satisfying. It is a full-time commitment and will consume most of the student's time in the semester in which it occurs. It takes place under the supervision of qualified program faculty and cooperating teachers. Student teachers will have two experiences (different grades and different schools) over the semester. All placements are in Pennsylvania schools near the College. In addition to daily classroom experience, students are required to attend a weekly seminar with their College supervisors.

Courses associated with student teaching include:

   Education 370 Seminar for Early Childhood Educators: Advocacy, Ethics, Leadership, Collaboration. Required for all early childhood education candidates.
   Education 371 Issues in Middle Level Education. Required for all middle level education candidates.
   Education 375, 376, 377 Student Teaching. Required for all student teachers.
   Education 378 Seminar in Secondary Student Teaching. Required for all secondary and world language education candidates.
   Education 379 Seminar for Art Student Teachers. Required for all art education candidates.
   Music 374.2 Music Education Seminar. Required for all music education candidates.

Art Education

Moravian offers a certification program in the teaching of art (K-12). Students complete a full major in art as described under the Art Education track. Students should take Education 100.2 in the fall or spring of the freshman year, Education 160 in spring of the freshman year, Education 130 fall of the sophomore year, Education 244 spring of the sophomore year, Education 163 in the fall or spring of the sophomore year, Education 260 fall of the junior year, Education 366 fall of the senior year, and Education 375-379 spring of the senior year.

All students interested in teacher certification are reminded that they must complete courses required for initial admission to the teacher certification program. Specifically, students must complete six credit hours (1.5 Moravian units) in mathematics as well as three credit hours in English composition and three credit hours in English literature.

Music Education

Moravian offers a certification program in the teaching of music (K-12). The academic program is described under music. Students complete Education 100.2 in the first year of study. Students also complete Education 130 and Education 160 in separate semesters of the sophomore year and Education 244 in the spring of the sophomore year or in the junior year. Student teaching and the concurrent seminar (Education 375-377 and Music 374.2) are taken in the spring of the senior year.

All students interested in teacher certification are reminded that they must complete courses required for initial admission to the teacher certification program. Specifically, students must complete six credit hours (1.5 Moravian units) in mathematics as well as three credit hours in English composition and three credit hours in English literature.

Early Childhood Education

Students seeking certification in early childhood education must complete a major of their choice as well as the College’s program of general education (Learning in Common). If preferred, early childhood education certification candidates may complete a pre-approved interdisciplinary program, which is composed of either eight or nine course units. Students must select Mathematics 125 to fulfill the Learning in Common Quantitative Reasoning (F2) requirement. (Students pursuing early childhood certification who choose a major in math are exempted from this course and requirement.) Students also need an additional half-unit course in math. (Again, students majoring in math are exempted from this requirement.) In the multidisciplinary (M) categories, students must take either History 113 or 114 to fulfill the requirement in Historical Studies (M1); English 101, 102, 103, 104, or 105 to fulfill the Literature (M2) requirement; Education 160 to fulfill the Ultimate Questions (M3) requirement; and both Education 213.2 and 214.2 to complete the Aesthetic Expression (M6) requirement. Early childhood candidates must complete an M4 or M5 (but not both), which may be a part of the major. The requirement not completed – M4 or M5 – is waived. In addition, early childhood candidates must complete only one of the Upper-Division (U) categories, which may be a part of the major.

Early childhood education certification students must complete the professional sequence in early childhood education:

   Education 100.2
      and 160

Taken in the freshman year, 40-hour field experience required for Education 160; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.

   Education 210, 222,
      and 244
Taken in the fall term of the second year; 40-hour field experience in that semester; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Overall GPA of 2.70 required to enroll.
   Education 211, 214.2,
       and 216
Taken in the spring term of the sophomore year. 40-hour field experience in that semester; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Overall GPA of 2.70 required to enroll.
   Education 312, 323,
      324, and 358.2
Taken in fall of the junior year; 75-hour field experience required; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; overall GPA of 2.70 required to enroll; passing PAPA tests required to enroll.
   Education 213.2, 218.2
      321, 322, and 358.2
Taken in spring of the junior year; 75-hour field experience required; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; overall GPA of 2.70 required to enroll; passing PAPA tests required to enroll.
   Education 370
      and 375-377
Taken in fall of the senior year; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; overall GPA of 3.0 required to enroll; passing PAPA tests and approval of the Teacher Education Committee are required to enroll.

EDUC 160 is a pre-requisite and EDUC 210 is a co-requisite for EDUC 244. A lab science (F4) course with a grade of C or better is required prior to enrolling in Education 323. Mathematics 125 with a grade of C or better is the prerequisite for Education 322, and an American history course with a grade of C or better is the prerequisite for Education 324.

Middle Level Education

Students seeking certification in middle level education (grades 4 through 8) must complete a major in mathematics, general science, English, history, or historical studies, or they may complete a pre-approved interdepartmental major in mathematics/general science, mathematics/English, or general science/English. See the Interdisciplinary Programs section for specific requirements for majors in general science and historical studies and for pre-approved interdepartmental majors. Students must also complete the College’s program of general education, Learning in Common. Students must select Mathematics 125 to fulfill the requirement in Quantitative Reasoning (F2) and Environmental Science 112 to fulfill the lab science requirement (F4). (Students majoring in mathematics, mathematics/general sciences, or mathematics/English are exempted from taking Mathematics 125. Students majoring in mathematics may substitute Physics 111 for Environmental Science 112.) In the Multidisciplinary (M) categories, students must take History 113 to fulfill the Historical Studies (M1) requirement; Education 131 to fulfill the Literature (M2) requirement; Education 160 to fulfill the Ultimate Questions (M3) requirement; Political Science 110 to satisfy the Economic, Social, and Political Systems (M4) requirement; and Interdisciplinary 110 to fulfill the Cultural Values and Global Issues (M5) requirement. The Aesthetic Expression (M6) requirement is waived for these students. In addition, middle level education students must complete one of the two Upper-Division (U) categories, which may be a part of the major; the other is waived.

Middle level education students must complete the professional sequence in middle level education:

   Education 100.2
      and 160
Taken in the freshman year, 40-hour field experience required for Education 160; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.
   Education 130
      and 140.2
Taken in the fall of the sophomore year; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.
   Education 131 Taken in the spring term of the sophomore year
   Education 244 Taken in fall of the junior year; overall GPA of 2.70 required to enroll
   Education 332, 333
      and 358.2
Taken in spring of the junior year; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; overall GPA of 2.70 required to enroll; passing PAPA tests required to enroll.
   Education 232.2,
      330, 331, and 358.2
Taken in fall of the senior year; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; overall GPA of 2.70 required to enroll; passing PAPA tests required to enroll.
   Education 371
      and 375-377
Taken in fall of the senior year; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; overall GPA of 3.0 required to enroll; passing PAPA tests and approval of the Teacher Education Committee are required to enroll.

EDUC 160 is a pre-requisite and EDUC 130 is a co-requisite for EDUC 244. Environmental Science 112 with a grade of C or better is the prerequisite for Education 331. Mathematics 125 with a grade of C or better and Mathematics 107 are prerequisites for Education 332. (Both Mathematics 107 and 125 are waived for students majoring in mathematics, mathematics/general science, or mathematics/English.) History 113 with a grade of C or better, Political Science 110, and Interdisciplinary Studies 110 are prerequisites for Education 330. Students must pass the reading, writing, and mathematics PAPA exams prior to enrolling in any stage 3 pre-student teaching course. These exams should be taken in the freshman year.

All students interested in teacher certification are reminded that they must complete courses required for initial admission to the teacher certification program. Specifically, students must complete six credit hours (1.50 Moravian course units) in mathematics as well as three credit hours in English composition and three credit hours in English literature.

Secondary Education

Moravian College offers teacher certification programs in the following areas of secondary education (grades 7-12 unless otherwise noted): biology, chemistry, citizenship education (formerly social studies), English, French (K-12), general science, German (K-12), Latin (K-12), mathematics, physics, social studies, and Spanish (K-12).

The programs of study leading to these certificates are described under the appropriate departmental headings in this catalog. Individual program descriptions also are available through the Education Department. See the sections on science education and historical studies for descriptions of general science and citizenship education/social studies programs, respectively. Students are advised to complete Education 160 and Education 130 in the sophomore year. (They must be taken in separate semesters.) Education 260 usually is taken in the fall term of the junior year and Education 360-365 in the fall term of the senior year. Education 140.2 and 244 should be taken any semester prior to student teaching. Student teaching (Education 375-378) occurs in the spring term of the senior year. Physical Education 236 is required as one of the student's physical education activities.

All students interested in teacher certification are reminded that they must complete courses required for initial admission to the teacher certification program. Specifically, students must complete six credit hours (1.5 Moravian units) in mathematics as well as three credit hours in English composition and three credit hours in English literature.

Special Education and English as a Second Language

Students pursuing teacher certification in early childhood, middle level, or any secondary (7-12) or K-12 certification area listed above, and who maintain an academic record above the minimum requirements for certification (in the major, in education courses, and overall) may request permission to pursue an additional certificate in special education or English as a second language (ESL).  Students approved for ESL supplemental certification enroll in a set of five additional graduate courses offered for advanced undergraduate students:

   EDUC 410.3 ( = graduate 670) Language Acquisition and Development
   EDUC 411.3 ( = graduate 671) ESL Curriculum and Instruction
   EDUC 412.3 ( = graduate 672) ESL Learner and Community
   EDUC 413.3 ( = graduate 673) ESL Assessment and Support
   EDUC 414.3 ( = graduate 674) ESL Program Specialist

Students approved for special education supplemental certification enroll in a set of nine additional graduate courses offered for advanced undergraduate students and an approved special education student teaching practicum. The nine-courses set includes:

   EDUC 420.3 ( = graduate 610) Differentiating Instruction
   EDUC 421.3 ( = graduate 617) Special Education Identification and Intervention
   EDUC 422.3 ( = graduate 618) Effective Inclusionary Practices
   EDUC 423.3 ( = graduate 623) Special Education Processes and Procedures
   EDUC 424.3 ( = graduate 624) Educating Students with Disabilities and Exceptionalities
   EDUC 425.3 ( = graduate 626) Comprehensive Literacy Pre-K to 4
   EDUC 426.3 ( = graduate 660) Literacy and Resistance/Secondary Schools
   EDUC 410.3 ( = graduate 670) Language Acquisition and Development
   EDUC 427.3 ( = graduate 676) Literacy Assessment and Evaluation

Full course descriptions are available from the Education Department or the Comenius Center.  Please note that students who complete these courses at the undergraduate level may not count these same courses towards a graduate degree at Moravian College, but they may count these same courses towards certification.

The Minor in Education

The minor in education for students not seeking teacher certification consists of five course units: Education 130, 210, or 211; Education 160; Education 244; and two additional course units in education, selected with the advisor's approval. Students seeking certification in one or more of the approved areas of secondary education will have a minor in education if they complete requirements for certification.

Interdepartmental Majors Including Education

Students whose personal objectives include study in education without teacher certification may develop an interdepartmental major with a Set II concentration in education. Such programs must be developed and approved by the Interdisciplinary Programs Committee as outlined under interdepartmental majors in the educational programs section of this catalog.

The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction (M.Ed.) & Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)

The Education Department offers a Master of Education degree in curriculum and instruction for practicing teachers. Each course in this 36-credit program is immediately applicable to the classroom, with an underlying philosophy of reflective teaching and a focus on action research. Courses are available to all certified teachers and may be taken as part of the larger M.Ed. program, to satisfy Act 48 requirements, or simply for intellectual and professional enrichment. Advanced Pennsylvania certification options are also available in ESL, reading, the principalship, supervisor of curriculum and instruction, and special education. Qualified graduate students may also pursue initial licensure and/or earn a graduate degree in education through our innovative inquiry-based Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program. Those interested in learning more about Moravian College's graduate degree and certification options should contact Joseph M. Shosh in the Education Department.

Undergraduate Courses in Education

Note: Students must complete all foundation (100 level) courses with a grade of C or better in order to continue taking upper level courses. All 100-level courses require an early field experience. They may not be taken in the same semester. Education 160 (all certification students) or 130 (for middle level, secondary, art, music, and world language certification students) should be taken in the spring of the first year. The other course should be taken in the fall or spring of the sophomore year. Students in early childhood or middle level certification programs should take Education 100.2 in their first term of study at the College.

In addition, all 200-level education courses have a prerequisite of a minimum overall grade point average of 2.70 for enrollment.

100.2. Introduction to Education of English Language Learners. Students will learn basic principles, issues, and strategies for English language teaching. This course will be an introduction to challenges of teaching English learners and offers a comprehensive overview of learning theories and teaching strategies. Attention will be given to such controversial topics as the influence of culture on schooling, the cultural practices of schooling, and the sociopolitical context of education. Students will learn clear models of strategic teaching leading to students' success. Fall.
DesJardin, Sillivan

130. Student Development and Instructional Design. The purpose of this course is to introduce pre-service teachers to the most current and effective principles for teaching students from fourth grade through high school. Cognitive, social, emotional, and physical developmental issues are examined in the context of effective classroom instruction. 40-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Fall and spring.
Dilendik

131. Young Adult Literature. Introduces students to reader response, socio-cultural, and New Historicist lenses for making meaning of a variety of traditional and emerging texts from the amorphous body of American literature written specifically for young adults. As participants examine classic and contemporary young adult texts, they construct blogs, wikis, and a literary analysis essay with hyper-textual links to articulate a philosophy for the inclusion of young adult literary texts in the secondary school curriculum, both individually and in tandem with canonical texts. (M2) Spring.           
Shosh, Richmond

140.2. Computer Technology in the Classroom. Instructional use of word processors, spreadsheets, databases, graphics packages, games, simulations, Web authoring programs. The Internet as a teaching/learning resource. Students will design lesson plans and demonstrate proficiency with technology specific to their academic disciplines. Two 2-hour periods.
Zigenfuss, Fuini-Hetten

158.2. Early Field Experience. Designed for students who need stage 1 & 2 early field experience in the K-12 classroom before stage 3 pre-student teaching. Students will be supervised by a teacher in a local school and spend a minimum of 40 hours in the classroom. They also will meet weekly for seminar with education faculty. Minimum of one education course taken at Moravian and permission of department chair required. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.
Modjadidi

160. Culture, Community, and Diversity: Introduction to Critical Teaching. Through field experience, reading, discussion, and intensive writing, students in the course will explore the diversity affecting their teaching, both within their classroom and within the broader community from which their students come. This examination will be both contemporary and historical. They will examine many forms of diversity, but in particular will examine how teachers need to consider language, culture, multiple intelligences, and learning styles in their work with diverse learners, including English language learners and students with disabilities. The course is unified through philosophical exploration of critical pedagogy, including the work of Paulo Freire and through the ethical issues related to teaching. (M3) Two 70-minute periods. 40-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Fall and Spring.
DesJardin, C. Evans

210. Child Development and Cognition I: Pre-natal to Five. This course is devoted specifically to child development from pre-birth to age five. This course will begin with an overview of child study in contemporary contexts and the role teachers play in early childcare settings. Major developmental theories will be addressed as they relate to physical and motor, social and emotional, and cognitive domains. The course will also focus on the application of knowledge to teaching and working with very young children and their families. Strategies and activities will be learned to work with young children from diverse populations. The concepts will be foundational for all of the courses in early childhood education. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70, Education 100.2 and 160. 40-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Fall.
DesJardin

211. Child Development and Cognition II: Six to Nine Years. This course is a continuation of the study of development of young children from six through nine. This course will begin with research and contemporary issues in learning and teaching. Major developmental theories as they relate to physical and motor, social and emotional, and cognitive domains will be addressed. It will also focus on the application of knowledge to teaching and working with early school age children. Strategies and activities will be learned. The concepts will be foundational for other courses in early childhood education. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70, Education 100.2 and 160. 40-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Spring.
DesJardin

213.2. Imagination and Creativity in Young Children. This course examines why art experiences are valuable in young children’s development and how to incorporate meaningful art activities across the preK-4 curriculum. Students in this hands-on class will make process-based artworks using a variety of art materials and learn how to adapt art instruction to ensure all children succeed, including diverse learners such as ELL’s and children with disabilities. Note: In combination with Education 214.2, this course fulfills the Learning in Common M6 requirement. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70. Prerequisite or Co-requisites EDUC 100.2, EDUC 160. Fall and spring.
Baxter

214.2 Music and Movement. This course presents the comprehensive, current professional research on music and movement while providing links between theory and practice. Students will also learn about a young child’s physical and psychological health and safety. The role of the family and diversity will also be discussed. Pennsylvania’s standards for the arts and humanities will also be addressed. (Note: In combination with Education 213.2, this course fulfills the Learning in Common M6 requirement.) Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70, Education 100.2 or 160. Fall and spring.
Aragona-Young

216. Early Childhood Education Theories, Practices, and Family Partnerships. This course presents a broad foundational overview that focuses on the concepts and issues of early childhood education. Students will develop a historical perspective as well as a contemporary view of issues and public policies. Theories of learning and development, which are applied in practice, will be explored along with new directions in cognitive development. The concepts of High Scope and Reggio Emilia programs are examples of the many being analyzed. Other topics such as family and community involvement, technology, guidance, play, assessment, diversity, special needs, ethics, and developmentally appropriate practices will be explored. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2 and 160. Spring.
Unger

218.2. Movement, Health, and Safety Education for Young Children. This course is designed to inform future early childhood classroom teachers, as movement educators, about the discipline of physical education and the role they can play in producing physically active and healthy, safe children. Specific attention will be given to motor skill and movement concepts and strategies, techniques, and approaches that teachers can use to lay the foundation for healthy practices in children. Prerequisites: Education 100.2 or 160; GPA of 2.70; no freshmen (sophomore standing or higher). Fall/Spring.
Ketterman-Benner

222. Emerging Language and Literacy, Pre-K to 4th Grade. The course begins with a brief overview of the recent key national policies and initiatives that have impacted the teaching of literacy from birth to kindergarten. Students will learn key aspects of language and literacy that will promote early reading success in preschool and childcare settings. They will be able to apply their learning into practice with a field experience. Students will expand their knowledge of the initial reading instruction practices that develop real readers. Students will also learn ways of preventing reading difficulties through developmental interventions. Assessment methods always inform programs so students know if a child is making process in reading-related skills and early reading. Students will also learn how to work with parents and policy makers who always influence early learning programs and who make decisions regarding early reading instruction. 40-hour field experience. Co-requisite: Education 210. Prerequisite: Education 100.2 and 160; GPA of 2.70. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Fall
Unger

232.2. Interventions for Middle Level Learners. The purpose of this course is threefold. First, it is to prepare the pre-service teacher to develop an inclusive learning environment, which specifically addresses the needs of the middle school learner. Second, it is to design and implement research-based interventions and instructional strategies, which address the needs of the middle school learner. These strategies/interventions will be based on accurate interpretation of assessment data, content knowledge, and understanding of the students' abilities and diversity. Third, it is to prepare the pre-service teacher to evaluate the effectiveness of the instructional strategies and interventions and adjust them as needed to promote on-going student success. Topics will include, but are not limited to, strategies specific to the diverse learner, collaboration techniques, research-based strategies and interventions, Response to Intervention, the Systematic Approach for Assessing/Accessing the Learning Environment (SAALE), data collection and monitoring techniques, variables which influence student success, assistive technology, differentiated instruction and the Universal Design for Learning. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2, 130, 160, 140.2, and 244. Fall.
Modjadidi

244. Including Students with Disabilities. This course is designed to familiarize students with current issues regarding special education services as they relate to students with disabilities, their families, and general education, the social model of disability, a historical perspective of special education services, special education laws and regulations at the federal and state levels, federal and state definitions, inclusionary practices, and research-based methodologies. Prerequisites: Education 160; Co-requisite Education 130 or 210; GPA of 2.70; sophomore standing or higher. Fall and spring.
Modjadidi

250. Art and Child Development. This is an introduction to the artistic development of children and adolescents and ways in which children’s cognitive, social, physical, and emotional growth affects this development. Students learn how developmental theories are applied to educational contexts. This class meets requirements for the Pennsylvania Department of Education, including teaching instructional strategies for making Accommodations and Adaptations for Diverse Learners in Inclusive Settings and English Language Learners. (M6) 
Baxter

260. Reflective Teaching in Secondary Schools. Introduction to general research-based techniques for use in secondary classrooms, from teacher-centered strategies (direction instruction) to student-centered strategies (cooperative learning, group discussion), and introduction to essential skills in instructional design for diverse learners. Through videotaped lessons presented to peers, students design instruction employing these strategies and learn how to self-critique their teaching. Prerequisites: Education 150 or 160; and 130; 244; or permission of instructor; GPA of 2.70. Two 70-minute periods. Forty-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Fall.
Gleason, Shosh

312. Data Driven Analysis and Decision Making in Early Childhood Education. This comprehensive course shows assessment as a process early childhood educators use to improve instruction and ensure learning. It will provide students with the most current research, best thinking and practical guidance to integrate assessment with effective teaching. Students will learn how to interpret and use many forms of assessment that will inform learning for educators, parents, learners and accountability requirements. Assessment is a comprehensive, reliable, and valid data-driven analysis that paves the way for meaningful, relevant, and engaging learning opportunities for children. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70, Education 100.2 and 160. 40-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Fall.
DesJardin

321. Language Arts for Children, Pre-K to 4th Grade. An introduction to the literacy process as it relates to children in the primary grades, kindergarten to fourth grade. The theory, knowledge, and teaching skills pertaining to the nature of the process will be explored by lecture, active participation, and classroom experience. This course includes reviews of current theory and research in language acquisition, cognition, and literacy. Literacy incorporates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and visual representation. Responding to literature, reading comprehension, fluency, word identification strategies, phonics, and language systems along with phonemic development and assessment forms will be a significant part of this course. This course also emphasizes the incorporation of technology and information management. Comprehensive literacy programs, including basal reading materials, will be surveyed. Inherent in the scope of the course is the nature of linguistics, learners’ abilities, and cultural variations as these factors relate to literacy learning. This will include strategies that meet the needs of linguistic, cultural, academic, and cognitive diversity. One of the underpinning goals is to prepare the student to think and respond like a teacher. 75-hour field experience.Co-requisites: Education 322, 358.2. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2 and 160; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Spring.
Staff

322. Pre-K to 4 Instructional Strategies for Math Thinking. Students will learn math as a developmental process, which engages children as they grow and develop. The new National Council of Teachers of Mathematics focal points, which use a chronological approach to thinking about what should be taught in early childhood mathematics, will be addressed. Students will learn that math is a developmental and constructive process in which the teacher acts as an instructor and facilitator. The course will view approaches for presenting math to different age groups. For pre-school and kindergarten children, math is learned through experiences with materials or projects. Grade school children learn from combining environment, materials and traditional educational experiences. The field experience will promote concept understanding and development through authentic experience in the development of students’ teaching skills and strategies in developmentally appropriate ways. Co-requisite: Education 321, Education 358.2. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2 and 160; Passing score on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics; Mathematics 125 with a grade of C or better. Spring
Staff

323. Pre-K to 4 Instructional Strategies for Scientific Reasoning. The aim of this course is to inform pre-service early childhood educators in science as a discipline. Students will learn how to make learning science both valuable and enjoyable for young children. Students will begin with an understanding of child development, interrelated math, literacy and science processes. Students in the field experience will use concept exploration design. Students will gain a solid understanding of scientific topics, while they are learning how to implement activities with children using constructivist and inquiry-based methods. Co-requisites: Education 324 and 358.2. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2 and 160; F4 science course​ with a grade of C or better​; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Fall.
Gleason

324. Pre-K to 4 Social Studies. Students learn a multitude of practical ideas, strategies, and activities that early childhood educators can use to both interest young children in social studies and integrate social studies with other sciences, art, literature, math, reading, and writing. Since play is the basic way children learn, this course offers strategies to incorporate “play” into its materials. Students will develop a full thematic unit as a major project in the course. Co-requisite: Education 323, Education 358.2. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2 and 160; ​History 113 or 114 with a grade of C or better;​ passing score on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Fall.
Dilendik

330. Social Studies for Middle Level Learners. The purpose of this course is to introduce pre-service teachers through practical example to the "methods of mind" which children need to develop to become scholars, social scientists, problem-solvers, and citizens. The goal is to have students design a series of activities and experiences that incorporate the most important of these methods. Most class sessions will involve discussion of the material, small-group problem solving, or the presentation of learning experiences for children. Co-requisite: Education 331, Education 358.2. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2, 130, 160, 140.2, and 244; History 113; Interdisciplinary Studies 110; Political Science 110; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Fall.
Dilendik

331. Science for Middle Level Learners.  A course designed to help prospective teachers interpret middle school students' science experiences and guide their understanding of scientific concepts.  The course involves application of science content through hands-on, inquiry-based activities. Co-requisite: Education 330, Education 358.2. Prerequisites:  GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2, 130, 160, 140.2, and 244; and Environmental Science 112. Passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Fall.
Gleason

332. Mathematics for Middle Level Learners. This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to work with students in grades 4 through 8 to help them learn important mathematical concepts, skills, and problem-solving techniques. In the process, it is hoped that thinking will be challenged and interest in mathematics stimulated. Co-requisite: Education 332, Education 358.2. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2, 130, 160, 140.2, and 244; Mathematics 107 and 125 with a grade of C or better; passing scores on PAPA Reading, writing and Mathematics. Fall.
Staff

333. Literacy for the Middle Level Learner. This course is designed to introduce the literacy process as it relates to children in the intermediate and middle school grades. The theory, knowledge, and teaching skills pertaining to the nature of the process will be explored by lecture, active participation, and classroom experience. This course includes reviews of current theory and research in language, cognition, and literacy. Literacy incorporates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and visual representation. Responding to literature, reading comprehension, fluency, word identification strategies, language systems and assessment forms will be a significant part of this course. This course also emphasizes the reading materials and reading in the content areas, will be surveyed. Inherent in the scope of the course is the nature of linguistic, learners' abilities and cultural variations as these factors relate to literacy learning. One of the underpinning goals is to prepare the student to think like a middle level teacher. Co-requisite: Education 332, Education 358.2. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; Education 100.2, 130, 131, 160, 140.2 and 244; Writing 100 or FYS; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Spring.
Staff

358 (or 358.2). Pre-Student-Teaching Field Experience.The pre-student-teaching experience is the precursor to the final stage of the certification process, student teaching. It is an opportunity for the student to become closely involved with classroom teaching and responsibilities while still being given extensive support and direction. The focus of this course is on the student's continuing professional development as they culminate their preparation for teacher certification. It is their challenge to demonstrate that they have the knowledge, skills, desire, stamina, and attitude to become an extraordinary teacher. The broad base of knowledge and fieldwork that they bring to this experience will help the students gain the expertise and confidence that is needed to be an exceptionally effective teacher. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.70; completion of Education 100.2, 130, 160; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing and Mathematics.
Frey

360, 361, 362, 364, 365. Curriculum and Instruction in the Secondary Content Areas. Explores the unique nature of subjects (English, world language, mathematics, science, citizenship education/social studies) as they relate to the fundamentals of pedagogy and planning within those content areas in preparation for student teaching. Major course requirement to design and then implement a unit plan in the field. Also examines avenues such as professional organizations for professional growth (organizations, publications). Required for all students seeking secondary certification. Students should register for the course that corresponds with their certification area. Prerequisites: Education 260 (may be taken together with Education 360-365), and GPA of 2.70; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing and Mathematics.
   360. English Shosh
   361. World Languages Jacoby
   362. Mathematics Donaher
   364. Science Gleason
   365. Social Studies Massey

366. Curriculum and Instruction in Art Education.While pre-student teaching in an art classroom, students in this seminar write an art education curriculum based on constructivist teaching and learning theories that are aligned with Pennsylvania Academic Standards for the Arts and Humanities and the National Visual Arts Standards. Prerequisites: Education 160 and 130; minimum 2.70 GPA; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Fall. One 3-hour period. Supervised 150 hours of fieldwork. Writing-intensive.
Baxter

367. Teaching Music to Children. Developing capacity for thought and action; skill in applying behavioral objectives, instructional strategies, methods of assessment, choosing appropriate content, establishing rational and realistic learning goals. Orff, Kodály, and Dalcroze methods. Prerequisites: Music 130.1, 136.1, and 322.2, Education 160; 2.70 GPA; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Spring. Three 70-minute periods; fieldwork.
Hirokawa

368. Teaching Music to Adolescents and Adults. Continuation of Education 367. Techniques of motivation and relevance, conducting middle- and high school ensembles. Prerequisites: Education 367; 2.70 GPA; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Fall. Three 70-minute periods, fieldwork.
Hirokawa

370. Seminar for Early Childhood Educators: Advocacy, Ethics, Leadership, Collaboration. This course is part of the student teaching/practicum in early childhood education. Students are assuming the responsibilities for teaching young children while receiving guidance and supervision. Students will review theory as they put it into practice. This research-based course will give practical advice on topics such as developmentally appropriate practices, teacher competencies, advocacy issues and the role of a professional in early childhood education. Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0; admission to student teaching; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics.                        
Frey

371. Issues in Middle Level Education. This course is designed to support the student during the semester of student teaching. The course meets weekly to discuss the issues related to the challenges of teaching and the process of certification and securing a teaching position. The student’s presence at each seminar is essential for the successful exchange of ideas, information, and coping strategies. The goal of this course is to develop the understanding, skills, and attitudes of the professional teacher – the teacher who acts with reflective consideration of principles, practices, and policies. The student will demonstrate evidence of professional knowledge and practice in the following areas: planning and preparation; classroom environment, instructional strategies, and professionalism. Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0, completion of all middle level education courses, except student teaching, with grades of C or better; admission to student teaching; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Co-requisite: Education 375, 376, and 377. Spring.                                          
Staff

375-377. Student Teaching. Three course units. Students approved by Teacher Education Committee work with qualified teachers in local Pennsylvania elementary and secondary schools for one entire academic semester. Scheduling and length of experience will vary according to grade level and teaching field. Under guidance of cooperating teachers and College supervisors, students have direct learning experiences in their areas. Prerequisites: QPA of 3.0, completion of all required education courses, except student teaching, with grades of C or better; admission to student teaching; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Co-requisite: Education 378. Pass/No Credit grade.
Staff.

378. Seminar in Secondary Teaching. Scheduled concurrently with student teaching. Students meet with subject area supervisors and Education Department supervisors on alternate weeks. Provides opportunity for student teachers to analyze their experiences in the field in relation to theory learned in previous courses. Prerequisites: QPA of 3.0, completion of all required education courses, except student teaching, with grades of C or better; admission to student teaching; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Co-requisite: Education 375-377. One 2-hour period.
Gleason

379. Seminar for Art Student Teachers. Weekly seminar integrates theory with classroom experience for pre-service art teachers' professional development. Prerequisites: QPA of 3.0, completion of all required education courses, except student teaching, with grades of C or better; admission to student teaching; passing scores on PAPA Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Co-requisite: Education 375-377. One 2-hour period.
Baxter

190-199, 290-299, 390-399. Special Topics.

286, 381-384. Independent Study.

288, 386-388. Internship.

400-401. Honors. Honors are normally taken fall and spring of the senior year. Because teacher certification students fulfill their full-time student-teaching requirement one semester of the senior year, they will need to complete their Honors work during the spring of the junior year and one semester of the senior year. Students interested in Honors need to plan for this early in their junior year.

Graduate Courses in Education

EDUC 500 The Teacher as Inquirer
The purpose of this course is to introduce teachers to current issues in inquiry-based approaches to teaching and learning, with an emphasis on developing essential questions related to their own effectiveness in the classroom.  The influence of action research on curricular and instructional change will be examined. (Three credits; Fall; Ziegenfuss)

EDUC 506 The Teacher as Researcher
This course introduces participants to the methods and strategies of action research.  The course will emphasize identifying and designing appropriate methods for collecting, organizing, displaying, analyzing, interpreting, and summarizing qualitative and quantitative information.  Ethical considerations in the collection of data will be stressed.  Prerequisite: EDUC 500 with B or higher.  (Three credits; Spring; Shosh.)

EDUC 508 The Teacher as Evaluator
This course prepares teachers to select, administer, and interpret assessment instruments in an informed and responsible way. Topics include the role of assessment in teaching, issues of reliability and validity, grading practices, and the use and interpretation of standardized and teacher-made tests. Formative and summative assessment instruments and alternative assessment strategies, including portfolio development and performance assessment, are also explored. Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System (SAS) is integrated throughout the course. (Three credits; Summer; Ziegenfuss.)

EDUC 600 Best Practices in Online Teaching
Best Practices in Online Teaching introduces the primary research-based concepts and structures necessary for effective instruction in blended and online learning environments. Through a variety of embedded projects in the field, registrants will design and deliver blended and online experiences, developing skills in the utilization of communications technologies in a variety of media to effectively communicate ideas and information.  (Three credits; Summer; Fuini-Hetten.)

EDUC 601 Online Teacher as Instructional Designer
The Online Teacher as Instructional Designer provides opportunities for registrants to develop learning modules for both blended and online learning. Utilizing a variety of available technology tools, students will create content modules, assessments and opportunities for learners to engage synchronously and asynchronously with other learners. Registrants will demonstrate effective online instruction as appropriate through the Educator Effectiveness model of teacher supervision and evaluation (adopted by the Pennsylvania Department of Education). As an online teacher, registrants will also learn the value of effective student feedback, accommodating diverse learners through the assessment process and implementing various research-based online assessment strategies, both formative and summative. (Three credits; Summer; Ziegenfuss.)

EDUC 602 Online Teaching for the Online Learner
Online Teaching for the Online Learner examines the conditions necessary for an effective online or blended learning environment. Registrants will explore issues of teacher and student ethics, including acceptable use, digital citizenship, legal issues with online education, confidentiality procedures/protocols, copyright, academic honesty, and strategies for communicating and collaborating with others in a global environment. The course also focuses on the ethical professional responsibilities of meeting the needs of diverse learners including students with IEP and ELL supports.  (Three credits; Fall; Ziegenfuss.)

EDUC 603 The Online Endorsement Capstone Practicum
This capstone course in the Online Instruction Endorsement Program sequence explores the professional role of the online teacher and includes a 60-hour practicum under the mentorship of a certified classroom instructor and college supervisor. Registrants will articulate a personal philosophy of teaching and learning in an online environment, conduct action research in the blended/online classroom and collaborate with school instructional and technology staff as they design and implement online/blended learning to meet the varied needs of diverse learners. Acting as an online instructor, registrants will demonstrate their abilities to plan, deliver, and assess instruction in a blended/online learning environment.  (Three credits; Spring; Ziegenfuss.)

EDUC 604 Online Curriculum Development
This course will provide educators with an opportunity to work with online resources that are available for the classroom.  Participants will also examine their existing curriculum and develop an online module that can be used in a traditional class setting. (Three credits; As Needed; Ziegenfuss.)

EDUC 605 Media Production: The Power of Digital Publication
Using a framework for network literacies, this course will focus on digital participation and the development of persuasion, curation, discussion and self-presentation skills through media production and digital publication. A variety of publication tools related to print, web, video, audio and interactives will be used to fully explore what it means to publish on the web and engage in participatory culture. (Three credits; As Needed; Ziegenfuss.)

EDUC 606 Reading and Writing across the Curriculum
Participants will explore a variety of process-based reading and writing strategies in the content areas, including shared and guided paths to independent reading, literature circles, and representing-to-learn activities. The specific needs of students with disabilities and English language learners will be addressed in the context of universal design of instruction and meaningful content area literacy in K-12 classrooms within a reading and writing workshop setting. (Three credits; Fall of Odd-Numbered Years; Conard.)

EDUC 607 Digital Alternatives to Test Preparation
In the high-stakes testing environment of NCLB, much valuable instructional time is used for the purpose of preparing students for standardized tests. As a result, meaningful learning with technology often takes a back seat to paper-pencil test preparation exercises or technology-based drill and practice. The purpose of this course is to demonstrate how teachers can create meaningful learning experiences that also prepare students to do well on standardized measures of achievement. This course will utilize digital learning tools that focus on inquiry, process and real-world relevance. (Three credits; As Needed; R. Ziegenfuss.)

EDUC 609 Teaching Grammar in the Context of Writing
How do teachers help students attend to matters of grammar, usage, and mechanics within the context of a process approach to writing?  This course is designed to answer this question by applying research in the field of language education directly to participants’ classrooms.  Teachers will plan and implement contextually based language mini lessons as part of a study of their teaching practice.  (Three credits; As Needed; Shosh.)

EDUC 610 Differentiating Instruction
This course will emphasize strategies of organizing learning opportunities of all students in today’s classrooms.  Participants will develop real lessons and handouts that utilize various strategies of differentiation. (Three credits; Fall of Odd-Numbered Years; Modjadidi.)

EDUC 612 Literacy Seminar in New Zealand
This study-abroad seminar is designed to develop the knowledge and skills pertaining to the nature of the reading process and the teaching of reading. Inherent in the scope of the course is the nature of linguistic and cultural variations as these factors relate to literacy learning in New Zealand and in the United States. (Three credits; As Needed; Unger.)

EDUC 614 English Education in London, Oxford, Stratford-on-Avon, and York
Explore strategies for the effective teaching of English language and literature within the largest European capital, England’s oldest university city, and Shakespeare’s hometown in rural Warwickshire.  Participants will examine the British public and private school system and visit key sites of interest to English teachers, including the reconstructed Globe Theatre on the South Bank of the Thames, Westminster Abbey, The National Gallery, the National Theatre of Great Britain, The British Museum, Oxford University, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Shakespeare’s birthplace, grammar school, and parish church.  Written projects include a journal, theatre critique, and English language and literature unit plan. (Three credits; As Needed; Shosh.)

EDUC 615 High Achieving Learners in the Regular Classroom
How do classroom teachers best meet the needs of all learners, including those designated gifted and talented or those who consistently meet and exceed classroom expectations? This course will examine the research base as well as specific strategies and techniques that classroom teachers can use to promote student engagement and achievement of gifted, talented, and other high achieving learners in the regular classroom. (Three credits; As Needed; Finger.)

EDUC 616 Drama in Education
Participants will explore the use of drama to facilitate student learning in the content areas, K-12, and will construct thematically-based curricula that incorporate drama-in-education principles.  Theories of dramatic art and historical uses of drama and theatre to promote mindful learning will be examined. (Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Finlay.)

EDUC 617 Special Education: Identification & Effective Intervention
This course examines the reasons for over-representation of culturally and linguistically diverse students in special education programs and examines evidence-based practices to build on students’ strengths to ensure academic engagement and achievement. Effective strategies for data collection and analysis will be employed in an action research context. (Three credits; Fall of Even-Numbered; Modjadidi.)

EDUC 618 Effective Inclusionary Practices
Major topics include a history of special services to students with disabilities, emerging trends and important legal issues related to students with special needs.  The primary focus of the course, however, is the design and application of strategies for effectively teaching these students. (Three credits; Spring of Even-Numbered; Modjadidi.)

EDUC 620 A Constructivist Approach to Teaching Mathematics
Participants will explore mathematical content and processes outlined in the NCTM Standards using a problem-solving approach.  Teachers will collect and analyze their own students’ work, read and discuss recent research findings, and design a teaching unit. (Three credits; As Needed; Staff.)

EDUC 622 School Law and Professional Ethics
This course focuses on the development and field-testing of a Policy Alignment Action Plan, entailing an examination of federal and state curriculum regulations and an analysis of the subsequent alignment of board curriculum policies and procedures.  Also, four position papers are required addressing ethics and professional conduct, curriculum policy alignment recommendations, school policies and student success, and the over-representation of diverse learners in special education. (Three credits; Fall of Even-Numbered Years; Grove).

EDUC 623 Special Education Processes & Procedures
Special Education Processes & Procedures will use the seminar format. The course will cover a through analysis of foundational aspects of special education services, legal issues, ethical and professional issues, instructional planning, inclusionary practices, collaborative practices, and current trends regarding special education services as they relate to students with disabilities, their families, general education, and the community. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the special education teacher in relationship to all topics discussed. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Modjadidi.)

EDUC 624 Educating Students with Disabilities and Exceptionalities
This course addresses the six interrelated elements of the standards-based system adopted by the Pennsylvania Department of Education: standards, curriculum, instruction, materials and resources for instruction, fair assessments, and appropriate interventions. Within this course, you will be expected to demonstrate your knowledge of how to effectively adapt or universally design curriculum and instruction for students with disabilities and students who are gifted. This will be accomplished by articulating the present level of performance for such students and by applying the instructional and curricular concepts from course readings and in class activities. Determining appropriate interventions and assessments will constitute important foci of this course as well. Students enrolled in EDUC 624 will be expected to enhance their practice knowledge related to effective teaching for students with disabilities by connecting that knowledge to theoretical constructs and research-based interventions. The examination of one’s current practice as a teacher, in light of the material covered in class, will be expected. (Three credits; Fall of Even-Numbered Years; Hogan)

EDUC 625 Making History Live: New Approaches to History Teaching
How can we teach our students in grades 5 to 12 to think like historians and at the same time bring history to life for them?  This course will explore answers to this question by examining an exciting and continually developing research base which suggests that students of all ages can be guided to think historically.  (Three credits; As Needed; Mayer.)

EDUC 626 Comprehensive Literacy Practices for Grades PreK-4
This course is designed to prepare teachers to utilize evidence-based literacy assessment and instructional strategies effectively in their classrooms. Teachers will investigate a variety of ways to thoroughly assess various components of a well-balanced, research-based literacy program for children from pre – K to 4th grade.  They will learn literacy assessment tools and techniques to identify students’ strengths and needs and strategies to monitor students’ progress and to plan effective interventions that will enhance literacy development, especially for ELLs and special needs learners. Empirically-based literacy teaching practices will be explored with references to the Pennsylvania Literacy Framework. (Three credits; Spring of Odd-Numbered Years; DesJardin.)

EDUC 627 Comprehensive Literacy Practices for Grades 4-8
Teachers will actively explore current practice and investigate contemporary research on literacy development.  Participants will share literature for the intermediate grades and examine a variety of topics including comprehension, response to literature, word analysis, process writing, the Pennsylvania Literacy Framework, and classroom management. (Three credits; Fall of Even-Numbered Years; Matz.)

EDUC 628 Literature Circles
What are literature circles and what does reading research suggest about their role in classroom literacy instruction?  Participants will examine a variety of models as they examine how to design, implement, and manage literature circles that support Pennsylvania academic standards for reading, writing, listening, and speaking. (Three credits; As Needed; Unger.)

EDUC 629 The Literacy Specialist
This course provides reading specialist candidates with an opportunity to put into practice theories of reading diagnosis and remediation, selection of materials and resources, and development of instructional plans for students. Under the supervision of the Instructor and an additional certified Reading Specialist, candidates will determine strengths and needs of individual students, including students with disabilities and English language learners, who are experiencing difficulties in reading; develop and implement intervention plans; and prepare professional case study reports.  Additionally, both in the classroom and in the clinical setting, registrants will examine the role of the literacy specialist, focusing on emergent literacy and the experiences and environments that support it, the causes and characteristics of reading and writing difficulties, and the reading specialist's role as the coordinator of the multidisciplinary process and in the early identification of special needs, including those of students with disabilities and English language learners. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Conard)

EDUC 630 Managing the Constructivist Classroom
How do teachers manage the transition from being the “sage on the stage” to the “guide on the side” when helping students to construct knowledge for themselves rather than receiving it ready-made from others?  This course examines contemporary views of cognition that suggest learning is negotiated, distributed, situated, constructed, developmental, and affective.  It simultaneously explores the research base for managing transactional classrooms. (Three credits; As Needed; Staff.)

EDUC 633 Teaching Mathematics K-8 with a Problem Solving Approach
This course is designed to help elementary and middle level teachers discover how to teach mathematics through real problem solving activities. Participants will review current literature in mathematics education and examine the Focal Points of NCTM and the Big Ideas from the PA Standards. Activities from the NCTM Navigation Series will be explored. Teachers using the 2nd editions of Investigations and CMP will explore units from these programs and gain sufficient understanding for successful implementation in their classrooms. (Three credits; As Needed; Staff.)

EDUC 635 Assessment in Mathematics K-6
Teachers will analyze their current practices while exploring related research on assessment. Teachers will design assessment tools to coincide with their curriculum.  Performance assessment, rubric creation, and observation techniques will be especially stressed. (Three credits; As Needed; Staff.)

EDUC 637 Making Meaning in Mathematics
Many people admit freely their inability to understand mathematics while asserting their need to use it as part of their professional lives.  This course will address numeric topics, algebra, geometry, and statistics so that participants can analyze the underlying principles of these fundamental processes.  A constructivist approach will ensure that participants build a conceptually sound basis for their mathematical thinking, enabling them to use math confidently and apply its tools successfully.  This course is especially relevant for science teachers who want to strengthen the math areas that are integrated into many science topics. (Three credits; As Needed; Staff.)

EDUC 640 Environmental Science Education
Teachers enrolled in this seminar will participate in a hands-on approach to the teaching of environmental science with an emphasis on the opportunities for environmental education that abound in and around school settings. An inquiry approach and outdoor fieldwork will be utilized to help participants develop practical experiences in environmental education for use in their respective school programs. (Three credits; As Needed; Evans.)

EDUC 650 Sociology of Education
This course will explore the dynamics of education and the socio-cultural narratives that emerge from rigorous governance of both content and pedagogy.  Of particular importance is the role that textbooks and other forms of educational material plays in managing public ideologies and the cultural linkage that underscore everything from national mythologies to socialization schemes as informed through a wide range of educational processes. (Three credits; As Needed; Rosen.)

EDUC 653 Transforming Classroom Instruction through Curriculum Mapping
Curriculum mapping has evolved as an invaluable communication, planning, and teaching tool.  Using this dynamic method, educators can document what is being taught, what students are learning, how well they are learning, and how closely the curriculum reflects local and national standards.  (Three credits; As Needed; Staff.)

EDUC 655 Standards-Based Curriculum Design
This course provides a systemic focus to the alignment of academic curriculum standards to student achievement through the development and implementation of an action research standards-based curriculum design school improvement project. The action plan for this project will integrate federal, state and district policies that address curriculum alignment, staffing, scheduling, budgeting, learning environment, and student capacity. (Three credits; Fall of Odd-Numbered Years; Grove)

EDUC 658 Building A Culture of Learning
This course investigates processes and strategies for inclusively building a school culture of learning with multiple stakeholder groups, both inside and outside the organization.  An action research project focused on improving student achievement is required.  The action plan for this project will address effective communication, collaborative school improvement, teacher leadership, family involvement, and the professional learning community. (Three credits; Spring of Odd-Numbered Years; Conard)

EDUC 660 Literacy and Resistance in Secondary Schools
What can intermediate and secondary school teachers do when students in their classrooms can't or won't read? How do learning disabilities and language issues affect students’ reading skills and desire and motivation to read? Participants will examine specific strategies to help adolescents develop reading comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, and word recognition. Participants will also explore the research base on issues of particular interest to urban literacy educators, including social class, language use, and oppositional identity. (Three credits; Spring of Even-Numbered Years; Conard.)

EDUC 667 Teacher Supervision & Evaluation
This courses focuses on a research and standards-based instructional systems model of performance-based teacher supervision and evaluation. Registrants will develop and field test component action plans for effective instruction, differentiated supervision, action research as professional development, and student behavior interventions that promote an effective organizational and classroom climate. (Three credits; Spring of Even-Numbered Years; Resende)

EDUC 668 Data-Driven Instructional Systems
Students will design and field-test a Student Achievement and Tools Action Plan, demonstrating how to access data and compile reports, how to analyze and report on student performance data, how to use student performance data in various planning scenarios, how to align curriculum and instruction with student performance data, how to use data to support systemic planning, and how to report results to multiple audiences.  A variety of administrative tools, including those recommended by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, will be utilized to access, analyze, and report on student performance and related data. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Principal Certification Program with no grade in certification program of less than a B. Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Ziegenfuss)

EDUC 670 Language Acquisition and Development
Participants will examine the structure of the English language, including its lexical, morphological, syntactic, and phonological components.  The process of first and second language acquisition will be studied in support of the literacy development of native English speakers and of English Language Learners (ELLs) at different stages of second language acquisition.  Teachers will learn to assist ELLs in communicating verbally and nonverbally.  Registrants will also examine best practices to facilitate the acquisition of English and promote the social and academic adjustment of all learners. (Three credits; Summer; Sillivan.)

EDUC 671 ESL Curriculum and Instruction
Learn how to meet the educational needs of your English Language Learner (ELL).  This course examines various ESL methods and teaching strategies to facilitate language acquisition.  Participants will develop standards-based ESL lessons and instructional materials and explore strategies for adapting classroom activities according to the proficiency level of the language learner.  An emphasis will be placed on current research and resources available to maximize the process of acquiring English and developing language skills.  Additional topics will include the role of classroom management, multicultural materials, and the ELL acculturation process in planning and instruction.  (Three credits; Spring; Correll.)

EDUC 672 ESL Learner, Family, and Community
This course will examine behaviors, belief systems, and attitudes of multicultural and multilingual learners, their families, and school personnel in promoting a culturally sensitive learning environment and community.  Research-based best practices will be explored, and emphasis will be placed on classroom/school implementation of strategies and techniques through action research methods.  Comparison of other cultures and how they relate to the American culture in the areas of education, language, support systems, and the community will also be explored. (Three credits; Summer; Modjadidi.)

EDUC 673 ESL Assessment and Support
Participants will learn to use effective assessment tools/practices to identify levels of proficiency and create assessments in speaking, listening, reading and writing to inform classroom instruction. Participants will also learn assessment of content areas to make adaptations for language acquisition and content learning. This course will combine readings, lecture, small group cooperative activities and hands-on assessment with English language learners. (Three credits; Fall; Goldberg.)

EDUC 674 The ESL Specialist
This capstone course in the ESL program specialist certification sequence explores the professional role of the second language teacher and includes a 60-hour practicum under the mentorship of a certified ESL classroom teacher and a college supervisor. Registrants will articulate a personal philosophy of second language teaching and learning, conduct action research in the ESL classroom, create a professional development plan and collaborate with general and special education school staff as they design and implement instruction commensurate to the ELLs’ proficiency levels. Taking on the role of the ESL program specialist, registrants will also demonstrate their ability to advocate for English language learners, their families, and communities; develop classroom activities that involve families; and model the use of culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogies. (Three credits; Summer; Sillivan.)

EDUC 675 World Language Curriculum and Instruction
This course is designed to help foreign language teachers employ the ACTFL’s proficiency and performance guidelines to teach reading, writing, listening, and speaking in contextualized ways.  Methods of integrating instructional technology, managing the classroom, and assessing student performance, both oral and written, will be addressed. (Three credits; As Needed; Conard.)

EDUC 676 Literacy Assessment & Evaluation
This course is designed to prepare teachers to select, administer, and interpret literacy assessment instruments in an informed and responsible way. Participants will explore a variety of formative and summative tools, including norm and criterion referenced tests, formal and informal inventories, portfolio based assessments, and anecdotal records. They will also learn to align instruction with PSSA testing data and examine how to develop interventions and instructional strategies for students with literacy-related learning difficulties, including students with disabilities and English language learners. Additionally, registrants will learn about the multi-disciplinary team process and the reading specialist’s role in the early identification of students with learning difficulties that may be related to specific learning disabilities or to the unique needs of English language learners.  Finally, participants will explore strategies for communicating assessment data effectively to students, parents, and other school personnel.  Students will gain clinical experience and practice through one-on-one and small group work with participants in the summer reading clinic. (Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Conard.)

EDUC 680-681 Independent Study

EDUC 690-699 Special Topics in Education

EDUC 700 Curriculum Development and Action Research
This course explores the relationships of learning theory and action research to curriculum design.  Various models of curriculum development are explored, and strategies for curriculum design are studied, leading to the development of a research question for the M.Ed. thesis. Prerequisite: M.Ed. Degree Candidacy with completion of 500-series and 600-series requirements with QPA of 3.0 or higher. (Three credits; Spring; Grove.)

EDUC 701 Writing a Review of Educational Research
Central to practitioner research cycles of observation, action, and reflection is an examination of a research base to provide focus for subsequent observations, suggestions for new classroom action, and theories through which to examine reflective practice.  This hands-on workshop will help participants to locate salient electronic and traditional secondary source research material, synthesize findings from multiple research studies, and draft a review of the literature on a specific educational research topic identified by each participant. Prerequisite: EDUC 700 with B or higher. (Three credits; As Needed; Shosh, Gilson)

EDUC 702 Reflective Practice Seminar
This is a capstone course through which students will carefully examine the philosophical and empirical bases for reflective teaching and learning.  Data for the action research thesis will be collected, coded, analyzed, and interpreted. Prerequisite: EDUC 700 with B or higher. (Three credits; Fall; Shosh.)

EDUC 704-705 Action Research Thesis
Candidates will work independently, under the guidance of a thesis advisor, to place action research data within the context of published studies and to report research findings in a final thesis.  An oral defense of the thesis will be required. Prerequisite: EDUC 702 with B or higher. (Three credits each; Spring; Shosh, Dilendik, and Grove.)

EDUC 710 Writing Educational Research for Publication and Presentation
Teacher research has the potential to improve teaching and learning beyond the individual teacher researcher’s classroom only when it is disseminated to and critiqued by a wider audience of professional educators. This course is designed to help master teachers prepare their research for publication in a professional peer-reviewed journal and for presentation at a local, state, national, or international conference. Using their master’s degree thesis data and analytic framework, registrants will design a conference poster, prepare a multi-media presentation, and draft a manuscript for submission to a professional journal. (Three credits; As Needed; Shosh. Pre-Requisite: Successful Completion of EDUC 704-05 or equivalent.)

EDUC 713 Facilitating School Improvement
Supervisory certification candidates enrolled in this course will develop a School Improvement Case Study; analyze context and student performance data; construct a consensual vision with stakeholder participants; conduct school improvement research appropriate to the specific school improvement initiative; align challenges, vision, program and school improvement strategy; and both implement and critique an action plan for the project.  (Pre-requisites: Admission to Supervisory Certification Program; no grade in certification program of less than a B; an up-to-date coursework portfolio approved by the Administrative Certification Officer.  Three credits; Summer; Grove.)

EDUC 714 Supervisory Practicum I
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate his or her knowledge of and competence in the fundamental concepts of supervising an instructional program.  Topics include identifying staff development needs and resources, planning activities to address the needs of the educational program, integrating curriculum across multiple disciplines, and budgetary planning for curriculum and personnel development. Please note: A signed statement of approval from the Administrative Certifications Officer indicating your portfolio of work satisfactorily addresses the supervisory coursework standards is a requirement needed prior to registration for EDUC 714. Any standards not addressed in the portfolio must have action plans developed for implementation in the practicum. (Co-Requisite: Supervisory Certification Candidacy and final fall 600-series course with no grade lower than B. Three credits; Fall; Villani.)

EDUC 715 Supervisory Practicum II
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate his or her knowledge of and competence in the fundamental concepts of supervising an instructional program.  Topics include designing curriculum scope and sequence, evaluating instructional methodologies and strategies, monitoring and developing alternative forms of student assessment, and assessing instructional service delivery. (Co-Requisite: Supervisory Certification Candidacy and final spring 600-series course with no grade lower than B.  Three credits; Spring; Villani.)

EDUC 723 Organizational Leadership
Students enrolled in this course will develop a School Improvement Case Study, including a stakeholder analysis and invitation to participate; school context and student performance data analysis; construction of a consensual vision with stakeholder participants; school improvement research appropriate to the specific school improvement initiative; alignment of challenges, vision, program and school improvement strategy; and the implementation and critique of an action plan for the project.  Please note: A signed statement of approval from the Administrative Certifications Officer indicating your portfolio of work satisfactorily addresses the PiL standards is a requirement needed prior to registration for EDUC 723. Any standards not addressed in the portfolio must have action plans developed for implementation in the practicum. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Principal Certification Program with no grade in certification program of less than a B. Three credits; Summer; Grove)

EDUC 724 Principal Certification Practicum I
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate his or her competence in meeting Pennsylvania Leadership Standards within a series of ongoing performance based projects designed to measure and document the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required by school leaders.  Projects include a school district case study focusing on student achievement, a multiple measures of data project linked to school reform, and an instructional tools project linked to classroom practice. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Principal Certification Program and completion of required 600-series courses with no grade of less than a B. Three credits; Fall; Villani.)

EDUC 725 Principal Certification Practicum II
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate his or her competence in meeting Pennsylvania Leadership Standards within a series of ongoing performance based projects designed to measure and document the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required by school leaders.  Projects focus on improving student achievement and include an action-based research project and the development and implementation of a curriculum project including scheduling and budgeting that integrates federal, state, and district requirements and policies. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Principal Certification Program and completion of EDUC 724 with B or higher. Three credits; Spring; Villani.)

Graduate Education – MAT Courses

EDUC 501 Young Adult Literature (MAT)
Introduces students to reader response, socio-cultural, and New Historicist lenses for making meaning of a variety of traditional and emerging texts from the amorphous body of American literature written specifically for young adults. As participants examine classic and contemporary young adult texts, they construct blogs, wikis, and a literary analysis essay with hyper-textual links to articulate a philosophy for the inclusion of young adult literary texts in the secondary school curriculum, both individually and in tandem with canonical texts. Spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 131.

EDUC 502.2 Introduction to Education English Learners (MAT)
Students will learn basic principles, issues, and strategies for English language teaching.  This course will be an introduction to challenges of teaching English learners and offers a comprehensive overview of learning theories and teaching strategies. Attention will be given to such controversial topics as the influence of culture on schooling, the cultural practices of schooling, and the sociopolitical context of education.  Students will learn clear models of strategic teaching leading to students' success.

EDUC 503 Student Development and Instructional Design (MAT)
The purpose of this course is to introduce pre-service teachers to the most current and effective principles for teaching students from fourth grade through high school. Cognitive, social, emotional, and physical developmental issues are examined in the context of effective classroom instruction. 40-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Fall and spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 130.

EDUC 507 Culture, Community and Diversity: Introduction to Critical Thinking (MAT)
Through field experience, reading, discussion, and intensive writing, students in the course will explore the diversity affecting their teaching, both within their classroom and within the broader community from which their students come. This examination will be both contemporary and historical. They will examine many forms of diversity, but in particular will examine how teachers need to consider language, culture, multiple intelligences, and learning styles in their work with diverse learners, including English language learners and students with disabilities. The course is unified through philosophical exploration of critical pedagogy, including the work of Paulo Freire and through the ethical issues related to teaching. Two 70-minute periods. 40-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Fall and Spring. (Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 160).

EDUC 511 Child Development and Cognition II: Six to Nine Years (MAT)
This course is a continuation of the study of development of young children from six through nine. This course will begin with research and contemporary issues in learning and teaching. Major developmental theories as they relate to physical and motor, social and emotional, and cognitive domains will be addressed. It will also focus on the application of knowledge to teaching and working with early school age children. Strategies and activities will be learned. The concepts will be foundational for other courses in early childhood education. Prerequisite: QPA of 2.70, Education 507. 40-hour field experience. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 211.

EDUC 513.2 Creative Expression (the Arts) (MAT)
In this course the emphasis will be on the process and not the product. Students will learn how to guide young children in creatively expressing themselves in the arts: visual, dance, movement, and drama. Students will also learn how to extend the arts into homes and families. National standards will also be addressed. Prerequisite: QPA of 2.70, Education 507. Fall and spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 213.2

EDUC 514.2 Music and Movement (MAT)
This course presents the comprehensive, current professional research on music and movement while providing links between theory and practice. Students will also learn about a young child’s physical and psychological health and safety. The role of the family and diversity will also be discussed. Pennsylvania’s standards for the arts and humanities will also be addressed. Note: In combination with Education 513.2, this course fulfills the Learning in Common M6 requirement. Prerequisites: QPA of 2.70, Education 507. Fall and spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 214.2

EDUC 518.2 Movement (MAT)
Health and Safety Education for Young Children
This course is designed to inform future early childhood classroom teachers, as movement educators, about the discipline of physical education and the role they can play in producing physically active and healthy, safe children. Specific attention will be given to motor skill and movement concepts and strategies, techniques, and approaches that teachers can use to lay the foundation for healthy practices in children. Prerequisite: Education 507; QPA of 2.70. Fall/Spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 218.2

EDUC 521 Language Arts for Children, Pre-K to 4th Grade (MAT)
An introduction to the literacy process as it relates to children in the primary grades, kindergarten to fourth grade. The theory, knowledge, and teaching skills pertaining to the nature of the process will be explored by lecture, active participation, and classroom experience. This course includes reviews of current theory and research in language acquisition, cognition, and literacy. Literacy incorporates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and visual representation. Responding to literature, reading comprehension, fluency, word identification strategies, phonics, and language systems along with phonemic development and assessment forms will be a significant part of this course. This course also emphasizes the incorporation of technology and information management. Comprehensive literacy programs, including basal reading materials, will be surveyed. Inherent in the scope of the course is the nature of linguistics, learners’ abilities, and cultural variations as these factors relate to literacy learning. This will include strategies that meet the needs of linguistic, cultural, academic, and cognitive diversity. One of the underpinning goals is to prepare the student to think and respond like a teacher. 75-hour field experience. Prerequisites: QPA of 2.70; Education 503; passing score on PAPA or PPST Reading and Writing. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 321

EDUC 522 Emerging Language and Literacy, Pre-K to 4th Grade (MAT)
The course begins with a brief overview of the recent key national policies and initiatives that have impacted the teaching of literacy from birth to kindergarten. Students will learn key aspects of language and literacy that will promote early reading success in preschool and childcare settings. They will be able to apply their learning into practice with a field experience. Students will expand their knowledge of the initial reading instruction practices that develop real readers. Students will also learn ways of preventing reading difficulties through developmental interventions. Assessment methods always inform programs so students know if a child is making process in reading-related skills and early reading. Students will also learn how to work with parents and policy makers who always influence early learning programs and who make decisions regarding early reading instruction. 40-hour field experience. Co-requisite: Education 510. Prerequisite: Education 502.2 and 507; QPA of 2.70. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required

EDUC 525 Pre-K to 4 Instructional Strategies in Math Thinking (MAT)
Students will learn math as a developmental process, which engages children as they grow and develop. The new National Council of Teachers of Mathematics focal points, which use a chronological approach to thinking about what should be taught in early childhood mathematics, will be addressed. Students will learn that math is a developmental and constructive process in which the teacher acts as an instructor and facilitator. The course will view approaches for presenting math to different age groups. For pre-school and kindergarten children, math is learned through experiences with materials or projects. Grade school children learn from combining environment, materials and traditional educational experiences. The field experience will promote concept understanding and development through authentic experience in the development of students’ teaching skills and strategies in developmentally appropriate ways. Prerequisites: QPA of 2.70; Education 503; Passing score on PAPA or PPST Mathematics; Mathematics 125 with a grade of C or better. Spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 322

EDUC 530.2 Computer Technology in the Classroom (MAT)
Instructional use of word processors, spreadsheets, databases, graphics packages, games, simulations, Web authoring programs. The Internet as a teaching/learning resource. Students will design lesson plans and demonstrate proficiency with technology specific to their academic disciplines. Prerequisites: QPA of 2.70; Education 503 and 507. Two 2-hour periods. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 140.2

EDUC 534 Including Students with Disabilities (MAT)
This course is designed to familiarize students with current issues regarding special education services as they relate to students with disabilities, their families, and general education, the social model of disability, a historical perspective of special education services, special education laws and regulations at the federal and state levels, federal and state definitions, inclusionary practices, and research-based methodologies. Prerequisite: Education 507; Co-requisite: Education 503 or 510; QPA of 2.70. Fall and spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 244

EDUC 553 Literacy for the Middle Level Learner (MAT)
This course is designed to introduce the literacy process as it relates to children in the intermediate and middle school grades. The theory, knowledge, and teaching skills pertaining to the nature of the process will be explored by lecture, active participation, and classroom experience. This course includes reviews of current theory and research in language, cognition, and literacy. Literacy incorporates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and visual representation. Responding to literature, reading comprehension, fluency, word identification strategies, language systems and assessment forms will be a significant part of this course. This course also emphasizes the reading materials and reading in the content areas, will be surveyed. Inherent in the scope of the course is the nature of linguistic, learners' abilities and cultural variations as these factors relate to literacy learning. One of the underpinning goals is to prepare the student to think like a middle level teacher. Prerequisites: QPA of 2.70; Education 501, 503, 507, 540.2 and 544; Writing 100 or FYS; passing scores on PPST or PAPA Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 333

EDUC 558 Pre-Student Teaching Field Experience (MAT)
The pre-student-teaching experience is the precursor to the final stage of the certification process, student teaching. It is an opportunity for the student to become closely involved with classroom teaching and responsibilities while still being given extensive support and direction. The focus of this course is on the student's continuing professional development as they culminate their preparation for teacher certification. It is their challenge to demonstrate that they have the knowledge, skills, desire, stamina, and attitude to become an extraordinary teacher. The broad base of knowledge and fieldwork that they bring to this experience will help the students gain the expertise and confidence that is needed to be an exceptionally effective teacher. Prerequisites: QPA of 2.70; completion of Education 502.2, 503, 507; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.

EDUC 559.2 Pre-Student Teaching Field Experience (2nd experience) (MAT)
The pre-student-teaching experience is the precursor to the final stage of the certification process, student teaching. It is an opportunity for the student to become closely involved with classroom teaching and responsibilities while still being given extensive support and direction. The focus of this course is on the student's continuing professional development as they culminate their preparation for teacher certification. It is their challenge to demonstrate that they have the knowledge, skills, desire, stamina, and attitude to become an extraordinary teacher. The broad base of knowledge and fieldwork that they bring to this experience will help the students gain the expertise and confidence that is needed to be an exceptionally effective teacher. Prerequisites: QPA of 2.70; completion of Education 502.2, 503, 507; clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.

EDUC 567 Teaching Music to Children (MAT)
Developing capacity for thought and action; skill in applying behavioral objectives, instructional strategies, methods of assessment, choosing appropriate content, establishing rational and realistic learning goals. Orff, Kodály, and Dalcroze methods. Prerequisites: Music 130.1, 136.1, and 322.2, Education 507 or 155; 2.70 QPA. Spring. Three 70-minute periods; fieldwork. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.

EDUC 570 Seminar for Early Childhood Educators: Advocacy. Ethics, Leadership, Collaboration (MAT)
This course is part of the student teaching/practicum in early childhood education. Students are assuming the responsibilities for teaching young children while receiving guidance and supervision. Students will review theory as they put it into practice. This research-based course will give practical advice on topics such as developmentally appropriate practices, teacher competencies, advocacy issues and the role of a professional in early childhood education. Prerequisites: QPA of 3.0. Admission to student teaching. Passing scores on PPST or PAPA in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 370

EDUC 571 Issues in Middle Level Education (MAT)
This course is designed to support the student during the semester of student teaching. The course meets weekly to discuss the issues related to the challenges of teaching and the process of certification and securing a teaching position. The student’s presence at each seminar is essential for the successful exchange of ideas, information, and coping strategies. The goal of this course is to develop the understanding, skills, and attitudes of the professional teacher – the teacher who acts with reflective consideration of principles, practices, and policies. The student will demonstrate evidence of professional knowledge and practice in the following areas: planning and preparation; classroom environment, instructional strategies, and professionalism. Prerequisites: QPA of 3.0, completion of all middle level education courses, except student teaching, with grades of C or better. Admission to student teaching. Passing scores on PPST or PAPA in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics. Co-requisite: Education 595-597. Spring. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 371

EDUC 575 Student Teaching (MAT)
Students approved by Teacher Education Committee work with qualified teachers in local Pennsylvania elementary and secondary schools for one entire academic semester. Scheduling and length of experience will vary according to grade level and teaching field. Under guidance of cooperating teachers and College supervisors, students have direct learning experiences in their areas. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. Pass/No Credit grade. Early childhood and middle level education candidates are encouraged to student-teach in the fall; art, music, foreign language, and secondary education candidates in the spring. Students seeking dual certification must student teach in the spring semester and will have 18 weeks of student teaching beginning January 2. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.  Three course units. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 375-377.

EDUC 576 Student Teaching (MAT)
Students approved by Teacher Education Committee work with qualified teachers in local Pennsylvania elementary and secondary schools for one entire academic semester. Scheduling and length of experience will vary according to grade level and teaching field. Under guidance of cooperating teachers and College supervisors, students have direct learning experiences in their areas. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. Pass/No Credit grade. Early childhood and middle level education candidates are encouraged to student-teach in the fall; art, music, foreign language, and secondary education candidates in the spring. Students seeking dual certification must student teach in the spring semester and will have 18 weeks of student teaching beginning January 2. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Three course units. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 375-377

EDUC 577 Student Teaching (MAT)
Students approved by Teacher Education Committee work with qualified teachers in local Pennsylvania elementary and secondary schools for one entire academic semester. Scheduling and length of experience will vary according to grade level and teaching field. Under guidance of cooperating teachers and College supervisors, students have direct learning experiences in their areas. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. Pass/No Credit grade. Early childhood and middle level education candidates are encouraged to student-teach in the fall; art, music, foreign language, and secondary education candidates in the spring. Students seeking dual certification must student teach in the spring semester and will have 18 weeks of student teaching beginning January 2. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required. Three course units. Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 375-377

EDUC 578 Seminar in Secondary Teaching (MAT)
Scheduled concurrently with student teaching. Students meet with subject area supervisors and Education Department supervisors on alternate weeks. Provides opportunity for student teachers to analyze their experiences in the field in relation to theory learned in previous courses. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Certification Program. Concurrent with student teaching. One 2-hour period. (Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 378).

EDUC 579 Seminar for Art Student Teachers (MAT)
Weekly seminar integrates theory with classroom experience for pre-service art teachers' professional development. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Certification Program. Concurrent with student teaching. One 2-hour period. (Undergraduate cognate: EDUC 379).

EDUC 586.2 Early Field Experience (MAT)
Designed for students who need early field experience in the K-12 classroom before student teaching. Students will be supervised by a teacher in a local school and spend a minimum of 40 hours in the classroom. They also will meet weekly for seminar with education faculty. Minimum of one education course taken at Moravian and permission of department chair required. Clearances and other documents for fieldwork required.