Education Department
 
   

Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction: Course Offerings

Moravian College’s master of education degree in curriculum and instruction has been designed to fit the specific needs of practicing teachers. Each course in the program is immediately applicable to the classroom, with an underlying philosophy of reflective teaching and a focus on action research. This thirty-six-credit program requires no admission exams or entrance essays, only a sincere interest in improving teaching practice. Courses are available to all certified teachers and may be taken as part of the larger M.Ed. program, to satisfy Act 48 requirements, or simply for intellectual and professional enrichment. The course descriptions provided here are based upon reasonable projections of faculty and facility availability. Course offerings are subject to change based on changes in circumstances upon which these projections were based and as deemed necessary by the College to fulfill its role and mission. To learn more about Moravian College’s master of education degree program in curriculum and instruction, please contact Dr. Joseph Shosh in the Education Department (610-861-1482).

500. The Teacher as Inquirer
The purpose of this course is to introduce teachers to current issues in reflective teaching, with an emphasis on developing essential questions related to their own effectiveness in the classroom.  The influence of action research on curricular and instructional change will be examined. (Three credits; Fall; Zales)

504. Contemporary Issues in Education
This course focuses on how contemporary issues manifest themselves within a K-12 educational setting. Students will explore current trends in education from four perspectives: the classroom, the school, the district/organization and the community. Through the investigation and application of varied models, theories and strategies culminating in a research literature review, participants will reflect upon their own development as teachers and potential leaders while also examining the effect of contemporary issues on student learning. (Three credits; Summer; Roth.)

506. The Teacher as Researcher
This course introduces participants to the methods and strategies of action research.  The course will emphasize identifying and designing appropriate methods for collecting, organizing, displaying, analyzing, interpreting, and summarizing qualitative and quantitative information.  Ethical considerations in the collection of data will be stressed.  Prerequisite: MEDU 500 with B or higher.  (Three credits; Spring; Shosh.)

508. The Teacher as Evaluator
This course prepares teachers to select, administer, and interpret assessment instruments in an informed and responsible way. Topics include the role of assessment in teaching, issues of reliability and validity, grading practices, and the use and interpretation of standardized and teacher-made tests. Formative and summative assessment instruments and alternative assessment strategies, including portfolio development and performance assessment, are also explored. Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System (SAS) is integrated throughout the course. (Three credits; Fall; Zales.)

574. Reading Specialist Internship

575. Reading Specialist Internship

576. Reading Specialist Internship

577. Reading Specialist Internship

600. New Technology in the Classroom
This course is designed to prepare classroom teachers to use new computer technology effectively as a tool of instructional design, curricular integration, and student assessment. Participants will become familiar with recently released instructional applications, web-based tools, and emerging technologies. (Three credits; Fall of Odd-Numbered Years; Ziegenfuss.)

601. Digital Storytelling
This course is designed to introduce teachers to Digital Storytelling, a 21st century literacy strategy that combines traditional literacy skills with digital media. Digital storytelling is first about telling stories and second about digital technologies. The technology engages students as they collaborate, create, and develop their digital stories. (Three credits; Spring of Even-Numbered Years; Ziegenfuss.)

601.1 Fractal Geometry
Topics include an introduction to fractals and iterated systems, fractal dimension, and cellular automata.  In addition to lectures and demonstrations, the workshop will include hands-on activities that incorporate course content into the current curriculum. (One credit; Summer; Fraboni.)

603. Web Tools and the 21st Century Classroom
Today there are over 1,500 free web tools available online that can help improve teaching and learning.  Through a social learning environment, you will explore some of these tools and discover ways in which they can transform the classroom into a place where students collaborate, exercise their creativity, and develop information, media and technology literacies. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Ziegenfuss.)

604. On-Line Curriculum Development
This course will provide educators with an opportunity to work with online resources that are available for the classroom.  Participants will also examine their existing curriculum and develop an online module that can be used in a traditional class setting. (Three credits; Fall of Even-Numbered Years; Ziegenfuss.)

605. Media Production: The Power of Digital Publication
Using a framework for network literacies, this course will focus on digital participation and the development of persuasion, curation, discussion and self-presentation skills through media production and digital publication. A variety of publication tools related to print, web, video, audio and interactives will be used to fully explore what it means to publish on the web and engage in participatory culture. (Three credits; Spring of Odd-Numbered Years; Ziegenfuss.)

606. Reading and Writing across the Curriculum
Participants will explore a variety of process-based reading and writing strategies in the content areas, including shared and guided paths to independent reading, literature circles, and representing-to-learn activities. The specific needs of students with disabilities and English language learners will be addressed in the context of universal design of instruction and meaningful content area literacy in K-12 classrooms within a reading and writing workshop setting. (Three credits; Fall of Odd-Numbered Years; Conard.)

607. Digital Alternatives to Test Preparation
In the high-stakes testing environment of NCLB, much valuable instructional time is used for the purpose of preparing students for standardized tests. As a result, meaningful learning with technology often takes a back seat to paper-pencil test preparation exercises or technology-based drill and practice. The purpose of this course is to demonstrate how teachers can create meaningful learning experiences that also prepare students to do well on standardized measures of achievement. This course will utilize digital learning tools that focus on inquiry, process and real-world relevance. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; R. Ziegenfuss.)

609. Teaching Grammar in the Context of Writing
How do teachers help students attend to matters of grammar, usage, and mechanics within the context of a process approach to writing?  This course is designed to answer this question by applying research in the field of language education directly to participants’ classrooms.  Teachers will plan and implement contextually based language mini lessons as part of a study of their teaching practice.  (Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Shosh.)

610. Differentiating Instruction
This course will emphasize strategies of organizing learning opportunities of all students in today’s classrooms.  Participants will develop real lessons and handouts that utilize various strategies of differentiation. (Three credits; Spring of Odd-Numbered Years; Modjadidi.)

612. Literacy Seminar in New Zealand
This study-abroad seminar is designed to develop the knowledge and skills pertaining to the nature of the reading process and the teaching of reading. Inherent in the scope of the course is the nature of linguistic and cultural variations as these factors relate to literacy learning in New Zealand and in the United States. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Unger.)

614. English Education in London, Oxford, Stratford-on-Avon, and York
Explore strategies for the effective teaching of English language and literature within the largest European capital, England’s oldest university city, and Shakespeare’s hometown in rural Warwickshire.  Participants will examine the British public and private school system and visit key sites of interest to English teachers, including the reconstructed Globe Theatre on the South Bank of the Thames, Westminster Abbey, The National Gallery, the National Theatre of Great Britain, The British Museum, Oxford University, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Shakespeare’s birthplace, grammar school, and parish church.  Written projects include a journal, theatre critique, and English language and literature unit plan. (Three graduate credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Shosh.)

615. High Achieving Learners in the Regular Classroom
How do classroom teachers best meet the needs of all learners, including those designated gifted and talented or those who consistently meet and exceed classroom expectations? This course will examine the research base as well as specific strategies and techniques that classroom teachers can use to promote student engagement and achievement of gifted, talented, and other high achieving learners in the regular classroom. (Three credits; Spring of Even-Numbered Years; Finger.)

616. Drama in Education
Participants will explore the use of drama to facilitate student learning in the content areas, K-12, and will construct thematically-based curricula that incorporate drama-in-education principles.  Theories of dramatic art and historical uses of drama and theatre to promote mindful learning will be examined. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Finlay.)

617. Special Education: Identification & Effective Intervention
This course examines the reasons for over-representation of culturally and linguistically diverse students in special education programs and examines evidence-based practices to build on students’ strengths to ensure academic engagement and achievement. Effective strategies for data collection and analysis will be employed in an action research context. (Three credits; Fall of Even-Numbered; Modjadidi.)

618. Effective Inclusionary Practices
Major topics include a history of special services to students with disabilities, emerging trends and important legal issues related to students with special needs.  The primary focus of the course, however, is the design and application of strategies for effectively teaching these students. (Three credits; Spring of Even-Numbered; Modjadidi.)

620. A Constructivist Approach to Teaching Mathematics
Participants will explore mathematical content and processes outlined in the NCTM Standards using a problem-solving approach.  Teachers will collect and analyze their own students’ work, read and discuss recent research findings, and design a teaching unit. (Three credits; Summer; Fluck.)

622. School Law and Professional Ethics
This course focuses on the development and field-testing of a Policy Alignment Action Plan, entailing an examination of federal and state curriculum regulations and an analysis of the subsequent alignment of board curriculum policies and procedures.  Also, four position papers are required addressing ethics and professional conduct, curriculum policy alignment recommendations, school policies and student success, and the over-representation of diverse learners in special education. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Grove).

623. Special Education Processes & Procedures
Special Education Processes & Procedures will use the seminar format. The course will cover a through analysis of foundational aspects of special education services, legal issues, ethical and professional issues, instructional planning, inclusionary practices, collaborative practices, and current trends regarding special education services as they relate to students with disabilities, their families, general education, and the community. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the special education teacher in relationship to all topics discussed. (Three credits; Summer of
Odd-Numbered Years; Modjadidi.)

624. Educating Students with Disabilities and Exceptionalities
This course addresses the six interrelated elements of the standards-based system adopted by the Pennsylvania Department of Education: standards, curriculum, instruction, materials and resources for instruction, fair assessments, and  appropriate interventions. Within this course, you will be expected to demonstrate your knowledge of how to effectively adapt or universally design curriculum and instruction for students with disabilities and students who are gifted. This will be accomplished by articulating the present level of performance for such students and by applying the instructional and curricular concepts from course readings and in class activities. Determining appropriate interventions and assessments will constitute important foci of this course as well. Students enrolled in MEDU 624 will be expected to enhance their practice knowledge related to effective teaching for students with disabilities by connecting that knowledge to theoretical constructs and research-based interventions. The examination of one’s current practice as a teacher, in light of the material covered in class, will be expected. (Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Gilson)

625. Making History Live: New Approaches to History Teaching
How can we teach our students in grades 5 to 12 to think like historians and at the same time bring history to life for them?  This course will explore answers to this question by examining an exciting and continually developing research base which suggests that students of all ages can be guided to think historically.  (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Mayer.)

626. Comprehensive Literacy Practices for
Grades PreK-4

This course is designed to prepare teachers to utilize evidence-based literacy assessment and instructional strategies effectively in their classrooms. Teachers will investigate a variety of ways to thoroughly assess various components of a well-balanced, research-based literacy program for children from pre – K to 4th grade.  They will learn literacy assessment tools and techniques to identify students’ strengths and needs and strategies to monitor students’ progress and to plan effective interventions that will enhance literacy development, especially for ELLs and special needs learners. Empirically-based literacy teaching practices will be explored with references to the Pennsylvania Literacy Framework. (Three credits; Fall of Even-Numbered Years; DesJardin.)

627. Comprehensive Literacy Practices for Grades 4-8
Teachers will actively explore current practice and investigate contemporary research on literacy development.  Participants will share literature for the intermediate grades and examine a variety of topics including comprehension, response to literature, word analysis, process writing, the Pennsylvania Literacy Framework, and classroom management. (Three credits; Spring of Odd-Numbered Years; Mickley.)

628. Literature Circles
What are literature circles and what does reading research suggest about their role in classroom literacy instruction?  Participants will examine a variety of models as they examine how to design, implement, and manage literature circles that support Pennsylvania academic standards for reading, writing, listening, and speaking. (Three credits; Spring of Odd-Numbered Years; Unger.)

629. The Literacy Specialist
This course provides reading specialist candidates with an opportunity to put into practice theories of reading diagnosis and remediation, selection of materials and resources, and development of instructional plans for students. Under the supervision of the Instructor and an additional certified Reading Specialist, candidates will determine strengths and needs of individual students, including students with disabilities and English language learners, who are experiencing difficulties in reading; develop and implement intervention plans; and prepare professional case study reports.  Additionally, both in the classroom and in the clinical setting, registrants will examine the role of the literacy specialist, focusing on emergent literacy and the experiences and environments that support it, the causes and characteristics of reading and writing difficulties, and the reading specialist's role as the coordinator of the multidisciplinary process and in the early identification of special needs, including those of students with disabilities and English language learners. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Conard)

630. Managing the Constructivist Classroom
How do teachers manage the transition from being the “sage on the stage” to the “guide on the side” when helping students to construct knowledge for themselves rather than receiving it ready-made from others?  This course examines contemporary views of cognition that suggest learning is negotiated, distributed, situated, constructed, developmental, and affective.  It simultaneously explores the research base for managing transactional classrooms. (Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Zales.)

633. Teaching Mathematics K-8 with a Problem Solving Approach
This course is designed to help elementary and middle level teachers discover how to teach mathematics through real problem solving activities. Participants will review current literature in mathematics education and examine the Focal Points of NCTM and the Big Ideas from the PA Standards. Activities from the NCTM Navigation Series will be explored. Teachers using the 2nd editions of Investigations and CMP will explore units from these programs and gain sufficient understanding for successful implementation in their classrooms. (Three credits; Fall of Even-Numbered Years; Fluck.)

635. Assessment in Mathematics K-6
Teachers will analyze their current practices while exploring related research on assessment.  Teachers will design assessment tools to coincide with their curriculum.  Performance assessment, rubric creation, and observation techniques will be especially stressed. (Three credits; Spring; Fluck.)

637. Making Meaning in Mathematics
Many people admit freely their inability to understand mathematics while asserting their need to use it as part of their professional lives.  This course will address numeric topics, algebra, geometry, and statistics so that participants can analyze the underlying principles of these fundamental processes.  A constructivist approach will ensure that participants build a conceptually sound basis for their mathematical thinking, enabling them to use math confidently and apply its tools successfully.  This course is especially relevant for science teachers who want to strengthen the math areas that are integrated into many science topics. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Zales.)

640. Environmental Science Education
Teachers enrolled in this seminar will participate in a hands-on approach to the teaching of environmental science with an emphasis on the opportunities for environmental education that abound in and around school settings. An inquiry approach and outdoor fieldwork will be utilized to help participants develop practical experiences in environmental education for use in their respective school programs. (Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Evans.)

650. Sociology of Education
This course will explore the dynamics of education and the socio-cultural narratives that emerge from rigorous governance of both content and pedagogy.  Of particular importance is the role that textbooks and other forms of educational material plays in managing public ideologies and the cultural linkage that underscore everything from national mythologies to socialization schemes as informed through a wide range of educational processes. (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Rosen.)

653. Transforming Classroom Instruction through Curriculum Mapping
Curriculum mapping has evolved as an invaluable communication, planning, and teaching tool.  Using this dynamic method, educators can document what is being taught, what students are learning, how well they are learning, and how closely the curriculum reflects local and national standards.  (Three credits; Summer of Even-Numbered Years; Staff.)

655. Standards-Based Curriculum Design
This course provides a systemic focus to the alignment of academic curriculum standards to student achievement through the development and implementation of an action research standards-based curriculum design school improvement project. The action plan for this project will integrate federal, state and district policies that address curriculum alignment, staffing, scheduling, budgeting, learning environment, and student capacity. (Three credits; Fall of Odd-Numbered Years; Grove)

658. Building A Culture of Learning
This course investigates processes and strategies for inclusively building a school culture of learning with multiple stakeholder groups, both inside and outside the organization.  An action research project focused on improving student achievement is required.  The action plan for this project will address effective communication, collaborative school improvement, teacher leadership, family involvement, and the professional learning community. (Three credits; Spring of Odd-Numbered Years; Conard)

660. Literacy and Resistance in Secondary Schools
What can intermediate and secondary school teachers do when students in their classrooms can't or won't read? How do learning disabilities and language issues affect students’ reading skills and desire and motivation to read? Participants will examine specific strategies to help adolescents develop reading comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, and word recognition. Participants will also explore the research base on issues of particular interest to urban literacy educators, including social class, language use, and oppositional identity. (Three credits; Spring of Even-Numbered Years; Shosh.)

667. Teacher Supervision & Evaluation
This courses focuses on a research and standards-based instructional systems model of performance-based teacher supervision and evaluation. Registrants will develop and field test component action plans for effective instruction, differentiated supervision, action research as professional development, and student behavior interventions that promote an effective organizational and classroom climate. (Three credits; Spring of Even-Numbered Years; Roth)

668. Data-Driven Instructional Decision-Making
Students will design and field-test a Student Achievement and Tools Action Plan, demonstrating how to access data and compile reports, how to analyze and report on student performance data, how to use student performance data in various planning scenarios, how to align curriculum and instruction with student performance data, how to use data to support systemic planning, and how to report results to multiple audiences.  A variety of administrative tools, including those recommended by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, will be utilized to access, analyze, and report on student performance and related data. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Principal Certification Program with no grade in certification program of less than a B. Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Ziegenfuss)

670. Language Acquisition and Development
Participants will examine the structure of the English language, including its lexical, morphological, syntactic, and phonological components.  The process of first and second language acquisition will be studied in support of the literacy development of native English speakers and of English Language Learners (ELLs) at different stages of second language acquisition.  Teachers will learn to assist ELLs in communicating verbally and nonverbally.  Registrants will also examine best practices to facilitate the acquisition of English and promote the social and academic adjustment of all learners.(Three credits; Summer; Sillivan, DesJardin.)

671. ESL Curriculum and Instruction
Learn how to meet the educational needs of your English Language Learner (ELL).  This course examines various ESL methods and teaching strategies to facilitate language acquisition.  Participants will develop standards-based ESL lessons and instructional materials and explore strategies for adapting classroom activities according to the proficiency level of the language learner.  An emphasis will be placed on current research and resources available to maximize the process of acquiring English and developing language skills.  Additional topics will include the role of classroom management, multicultural materials, and the ELL acculturation process in planning and instruction.  (Three credits; Spring; Correll.)

672. ESL Learner, Family, and Community
This course will examine behaviors, belief systems, and attitudes of multicultural and multilingual learners, their families, and school personnel in promoting a culturally sensitive learning environment and community.  Research-based best practices will be explored, and emphasis will be placed on classroom/school implementation of strategies and techniques through action research methods.  Comparison of other cultures and how they relate to the American culture in the areas of education, language, support systems, and the community will also be explored. (Three credits; Summer; Modjadidi.)

673. ESL Assessment and Support
Participants will learn to use effective assessment tools/practices to identify levels of proficiency in oral language, reading, and writing.  Participants will also monitor student progress in the content areas and examine school support services to assist ELLs in language acquisition and content learning.  This course will combine lecture, small group discussions, small group cooperative activities, and hands-on activities with English Language Learners. (Three credits; Fall; Goldberg.)

674. The ESL Program Specialist
This capstone course in the ESL program specialist certification sequence explores the professional role of the second language teacher and includes a 60-hour practicum under the mentorship of a certified ESL classroom teacher and a college supervisor. Registrants will articulate a personal philosophy of second language teaching and learning, conduct action research in the ESL classroom, create a professional development plan and collaborate with general and special education school staff as they design and implement instruction commensurate to the ELLs’ proficiency levels. Taking on the role of the ESL program specialist, registrants will also demonstrate their ability to advocate for English language learners, their families, and communities; develop classroom activities that involve families; and model the use of culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogies. (Three credits; Summer; Staff.)

675. World Language Curriculum and Instruction
This course is designed to help foreign language teachers employ the ACTFL’s proficiency and performance guidelines to teach reading, writing, listening, and speaking in contextualized ways.  Methods of integrating instructional technology, managing the classroom, and assessing student performance, both oral and written, will be addressed. (Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Conard.)

676. Literacy Assessment & Evaluation
This course is designed to prepare teachers to select, administer, and interpret literacy assessment instruments in an informed and responsible way. Participants will explore a variety of formative and summative tools, including norm and criterion referenced tests, formal and informal inventories, portfolio based assessments, and anecdotal records. They will also learn to align instruction with PSSA testing data and examine how to develop interventions and instructional strategies for students with literacy-related learning difficulties, including students with disabilities and English language learners. Additionally, registrants will learn about the multi-disciplinary team process and the reading specialist’s role in the early identification of students with learning difficulties that may be related to specific learning disabilities or to the unique needs of English language learners.  Finally, participants will explore strategies for communicating assessment data effectively to students, parents, and other school personnel.  Students will gain clinical experience and practice through one-on-one and small group work with participants in the summer reading clinic. (Three credits; Summer of Odd-Numbered Years; Conard.)

678. NBPTS Mentorship Practicum I
Prepare a teaching and learning portfolio in alignment with the core propositions of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.  Gather and analyze classroom data to support written narratives of documented professional accomplishments and classroom teaching. (Three credits; Spring; Mickley.)

679. NBPTS Mentorship Practicum II
Conclude preparation of a teaching and learning portfolio in alignment with the core propositions of the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards.  Gather and analyze classroom data to support written narratives of documented professional accomplishments and classroom teaching.  Begin preparation for the six NBPTS assessment center examinations. (Three credits; Fall; Mickley.)

680-681. Independent Study
(Three credits; To Be Arranged; Staff.)

690-699. Special Topics in Education
(To Be Announced; Staff) Past special topics courses have included:

Contemporary Issues in Science Education
Teachers enrolled in this seminar will research and discuss current topics and events facing teachers in science education today.  Interactive class participation as well as group work will be emphasized in dealing with issues such as evolution versus intelligent design, cloning, stem cell research, the Big Bang Theory, the continuation of the space exploration program, preservation of the rain forests, the ocean as a natural resource, global warming, and or aging population and longevity.  Other topics will be included in the class, and students will have the opportunity to incorporate items of their own personal interest.

Digital Video Classroom Applications
This hands-on special topics seminar will focus on adding new dimensions to classroom learning experiences through the creation of audio and video clips that can be incorporated into PowerPoint presentations.  Topics include introductory audio and video editing, the creation of video clips, and the development of multimedia presentations and learning units.  The course will use standard editing software available for the Macintosh computer.  Experiences can be easily transferred to the PC platform.

Electronic Portfolio
Examine the construction of digital portfolio in which students document and reflect upon their learning journey as they compile annotated bookmarks, blogs, photos, digital media, and other artifacts.  While educators typically look at portfolios more narrowly as collections of evidence or products with a specific focus on past learning, this course will work to expand that model to examine the portfolio as process-based tool that supports student learning in the present and future as a central facet of the personal learning environment.

Environmental Science Education
Each course will offer three one-day workshops on the ecology and natural history of the Lehigh Gap.  Topics will include Pennsylvania birds and wildlife, forest ecology and trees, natural history, phytoremediation and habitat gardening, pond and river ecology, and geology.

Lesson Study in Mathematics
Teachers will work in small groups to examine their practice of teaching mathematics.  They will collaborate on a number of study lessons using a modified form of Japanese Lesson Study.  To provide focus and direction, teachers will select an overarching goal and related research question that they want to explore.  This research question will serve to guide their work and critique the lessons.  Final reports on what the study lesson taught the teachers will be made with particular respect to the research questions.

Teaching Mathematics K-8 With A Problem Solving Approach
This course is designed to help teachers discover how they can teach mathematics using authentic problem solving.  Participants will review current literature in mathematics teaching an align instruction to the Focal Points of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the Eligible Content from the PA Standards.  Participants will explore units from the new Investigations and CMP programs and develop lessons for successful implementation in their classrooms.

Music Education – Jazz Institute
This three-day course/workshop for music educators offers instruction in jazz and jazz pedagogy; topics will include teaching jazz in ensembles, classrooms and general music settings.  Participants will have the opportunity to work with world class, visiting professors and jazz experts in Moravian’s colonial-era buildings. 

Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science
Evolution is one of the most important and most widely misunderstood concepts in science.  This course is designed to help students deepen their understanding of evolutionary concepts, develop instructional strategies, and address obstacles in the teaching of evolution.  It may also be of interest to anyone who would like to learn more about evolutionary biology.  The course explores the historical development of evolutionary ideas, contemporary evolutionary theory and supporting evidence, and current ideas on human evolution.  In addition, students will learn about theoretical bases and strategies for improving teaching and learning about evolution in secondary school courses.

Technological Alternatives to Term Papers
For many students the act of writing a term paper is laborious and the final product does not adequately reflect the student’s creativity and ability to do research.  Learn how to use presentation software and create Podcasts that incorporate audio, video and digital imaging technologies as a means for creating a research presentation.  The course will use standard editing software available for the Macintosh computer.  Experiences can be transferred to the PC platform.

Web Quests
A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented activity in which most or all of the information used by learners is drawn from the Web.  WebQuests are designed to use learners’ time well, to focus on using information rather than looking for it, and to support learners’ thinking at the levels of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.  Participants will explore several WebQuests as an independent activity and then create their own WebQuest.

Web Tools and the 21st Century Classroom
Today there are over 1,500 free web tools available online that can help improve teaching and learning.  Through a social learning environment, you will explore some of these tools and discover ways in which they can transform the classroom into a place where students collaborate, exercise their creativity, and develop information, media and technology literacies.
 
Teaching and Learning with Electronic Portfolios
Examine the construction of digital portfolios in which students document and reflect upon their learning journey as they compile annotated bookmarks, blogs, photos, digital media, and other artifacts. While educators typically look at portfolios more narrowly as collections of evidence or products with a specific focus on past learning, this course will work to expand that model to examine the portfolio as process-based tool that supports student learning in the present and future as a central facet of the personal learning environment. (Three credits; Summer of odd-numbered years; Ziegenfuss.)

699. Perspectives in Multicultural Education
Discussions of race and culture can provide rich sources for increased K-12 classroom communication and learning opportunities.  Through this course, participants will have an opportunity to examine, discuss, and apply culturally responsive practices to their teaching.  Participants will learn practical tools for teaching and connecting with students of all backgrounds, while critically examining culture and racial categories and how they impact schools and society. Participants will also reflect on and apply culturally responsive teaching practices by taking an inquiry stance on practice as they gain a better understanding of the theoretical and ideological foundations of culturally responsive teaching. (Three credits; Fall 2010; Fulmer.)

700. Curriculum Development and Action Research
This course explores the relationships of learning theory and action research to curriculum design.  Various models of curriculum development are explored, and strategies for curriculum design are studied, leading to the development of a research question for the M.Ed. thesis. Prerequisite: M.Ed. Degree Candidacy with completion of 500-series and 600-series requirements with QPA of 3.0 or higher. (Three credits; Spring; Zales.)

701. Conducting and Writing a Review of Educational Research
Central to practitioner research cycles of observation, action, and reflection is an examination of a research base to provide focus for subsequent observations, suggestions for new classroom action, and theories through which to examine reflective practice.  This hands-on workshop will help participants to locate salient electronic and traditional secondary source research material, synthesize findings from multiple research studies, and draft a review of the literature on a specific educational research topic identified by each participant. Prerequisite: MEDU 700 with B or higher. (Three credits; Summer; Shosh, Gilson)

702. Reflective Practice Seminar
This is a capstone course through which students will carefully examine the philosophical and empirical bases for reflective teaching and learning.  Data for the action research thesis will be collected, coded, analyzed, and interpreted. Prerequisite: MEDU 700 with B or higher. (Three credits; Fall; Shosh and Zales.)

704-705. Action Research Thesis
Candidates will work independently, under the guidance of a thesis advisor, to place action research data within the context of published studies and to report research findings in a final thesis.  An oral defense of the thesis will be required. Prerequisite: MEDU 702 with B or higher. (Three credits each; Spring; Shosh, Zales, Dilendik, and Gilson.)

710. Writing Educational Research for Publication and Presentation
Teacher research has the potential to improve teaching and learning beyond the individual teacher researcher’s classroom only when it is disseminated to and critiqued by a wider audience of professional educators. This course is designed to help master teachers prepare their research for publication in a professional peer-reviewed journal and for presentation at a local, state, national, or international conference. Using their master’s degree thesis data and analytic framework, registrants will design a conference poster, prepare a multi-media presentation, and draft a manuscript for submission to a professional journal. (Three credits; Summer; Shosh. Pre-Requisite: Successful Completion of MEDU 704-05 or equivalent.)

714. Supervisory Practicum I
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate his or her knowledge of and competence in the fundamental concepts of supervising an instructional program.  Topics include identifying staff development needs and resources, planning activities to address the needs of the educational program, integrating curriculum across multiple disciplines, and budgetary planning for curriculum and personnel development. Please note: A signed statement of approval from the Administrative Certifications Officer indicating your portfolio of work satisfactorily addresses the supervisory coursework standards is a requirement needed prior to registration for MEDU 714. Any standards not addressed in the portfolio must have action plans developed for implementation in the
practicum. (Co-Requisite: Supervisory Certification Candidacy and final fall 600-series course with no grade lower than B. Three credits; Fall; Villani.)

715. Supervisory Practicum II
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate his or her knowledge of and competence in the fundamental concepts of supervising an instructional program.  Topics include designing curriculum scope and sequence, evaluating instructional methodologies and strategies, monitoring and developing alternative forms of student assessment, and assessing instructional service delivery. (Co-Requisite: Supervisory Certification Candidacy and final spring 600-series course with no grade lower than B.  Three credits; Spring; Villani.)

723. Organizational Leadership
Students enrolled in this course will develop a School Improvement Case Study, including a stakeholder analysis and invitation to participate; school context and student performance data analysis; construction of a consensual vision with stakeholder participants; school improvement research appropriate to the specific school improvement initiative; alignment of challenges, vision, program and school improvement strategy; and the implementation and critique of an action plan for the project.  Please note: A signed statement of approval from the Administrative Certifications Officer indicating your portfolio of work satisfactorily addresses the PiL standards is a requirement needed prior to registration for MEDU 723. Any standards not addressed in the portfolio must have action plans developed for implementation in the practicum. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Principal Certification Program with no grade in certification program of less than a B. Three credits; Summer; Grove)

724. Principal Practicum I
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate his or her competence in meeting Pennsylvania Leadership Standards within a series of ongoing performance based projects designed to measure and document the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required by school leaders.  Projects include a school district case study focusing on student achievement, a multiple measures of data project linked to school reform, and an instructional tools project linked to classroom practice. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Principal Certification Program and completion of required 600-series courses with no grade of less than a B. Three credits; Fall; Villani.)

725. Principal Practicum II
This course provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate his or her competence in meeting Pennsylvania Leadership Standards within a series of ongoing performance based projects designed to measure and document the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required by school leaders.  Projects focus on improving student achievement and include an action-based research project and the development and implementation of a curriculum project including scheduling and budgeting that integrates federal, state, and district requirements and policies. (Pre-requisite: Admission to Principal Certification Program and completion of MEDU 724 with B or higher. Three credits; Spring; Villani.)

 

Revised: October 5, 2012

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Education Department Moravian College / 1200 Main Street, Bethlehem PA, 18081
Dr. Joseph Shosh, Department Chair – phone: (610) 861-1482 / fax: (610) 861-1696 / email: jshosh@moravian.edu