IN FOCUS Academic Resources

 

Institute of Medicine (IOM):  www.iom.edu

What is the IOM?

From the IOM website (retrieved 9/12/13):

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) is an independent, nonprofit organization that works outside of government to provide unbiased and authoritative advice to decision makers and the public. 

Established in 1970, the IOM is the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences, which was chartered under President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. Nearly 150 years later, the National Academy of Sciences has expanded into what is collectively known as the National Academies, which comprises the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council, and the IOM.

Many of the studies that the IOM undertakes begin as specific mandates from Congress; still others are requested by federal agencies and independent organizations. While our expert, consensus committees are vital to our advisory role, the IOM also convenes a series of forums, roundtables, and standing committees, as well as other activities, to facilitate discussion, discovery, and critical, cross-disciplinary thinking.

Specially-commissioned IOM expert panels provide analysis and recommendations of a plethora of topics that are health-care related, including environmental health issues, which straddles issues germane to the In Focus Sustainability theme.  IOM environment health reports may be retrieved here:  http://www.iom.edu/Global/Topics/Environmental-Health.aspx

back to top

 

The National Institutes of Health (NIH):  www.nih.gov

What is the NIH?

From the NIH website (retrieved 9/12/13):

Founded in 1887, the National Institutes of Health today is one of the world's foremost medical research centers, and the Federal focal point for medical research in the United States. The NIH, comprising 27 separate Institutes and Centers, is one of eight health agencies of the Public Health Service which, in turn, is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Simply described, the goal of NIH research is to acquire new knowledge to help prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat disease and disability, from the rarest genetic disorder to the common cold. The NIH mission is to uncover new knowledge that will lead to better health for everyone. NIH works toward that mission by: conducting research in its own laboratories; supporting the research of non-Federal scientists in universities, medical schools, hospitals, and research institutions throughout the country and abroad; helping in the training of research investigators; and fostering communication of medical and health sciences information.

One of the NIH Institutes is the National Institute of Nursing Research; that website may be perused here:  http://www.ninr.nih.gov/

back to top

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):  www.cdc.gov

What is the CDC?

From the CDC website (retrieved 9/12/13):

CDC works 24/7 to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same.

CDC increases the health security of our nation. As the nation’s health protection agency, CDC saves lives and protects people from health threats. To accomplish our mission, CDC conducts critical science and provides health information that protects our nation against expensive and dangerous health threats, and responds when these arise.

The CDC website has a wealth of information that is organized topically.  One site provides a host of information pertinent to environmental health, which straddles last year’s In Focus theme of Sustainability.  This particular site includes tools and resources that may be downloaded, at http://www.cdc.gov/Environmental/

back to top

 

The National Guidelines Clearinghouse (NGC):  www.guideline.gov

What is the NGC?

From the NGC website (retrieved 9/12/13):

NGC is an initiative of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NGC was originally created by AHRQ in partnership with the American Medical Association and the American Association of Health Plans (now America's Health Insurance Plans [AHIP]).

The NGC mission is to provide physicians and other health professionals, health care providers, health plans, integrated delivery systems, purchasers, and others an accessible mechanism for obtaining objective, detailed information on clinical practice guidelines and to further their dissemination, implementation, and use.

back to top

 

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI):  www.ihi.org

What is the IHI?

From the IHI website (retrieved 9/12/13):

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), an independent not-for-profit organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a leading innovator in health and health care improvement worldwide. At our core, we believe everyone should get the best care and health possible. This passionate belief fuels our mission to improve health and health care.

For more than 25 years, we have partnered with visionaries, leaders, and front-line practitioners around the globe to spark bold, inventive ways to improve the health of individuals and populations. To advance our mission, IHI's work is focused in five key areas: Improvement Capability; Person- and Family-Centered Care; Patient Safety; Quality, Cost, and Value; and Triple Aim for Populations.

We create dynamic opportunities for health care professionals to learn from, collaborate with, and be inspired by expert faculty and colleagues throughout the world. Our professional development programs — including conferences, seminars, and audio and web-based programs — inform every level of the workforce, from executive leaders to front-line staff. The IHI Open School is committed to developing students, the next generation of improvers, through free online courses and an international network of chapters. For all who join us in improving health care, we provide a wealth of free content through our website, ihi.org and our audio program, WIHI.

IHI also works with a wide range of entities — whether health care facilities, entire health care systems, or governments — to help them achieve significant results in quality, safety, and innovation. We collaborate with these change agents on the front lines of care to accelerate improvement in vital areas, including maternal and neonatal health, end-of-life care, avoidable hospital readmissions, waste and cost reduction, person- and family-centered care, and the spread of the Triple Aim.

When it comes to raising the quality of health for all, IHI sees boundless possibilities; while we see the walls in front of us, we will not rest until we reach the other side.

back to top

 

The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC): ipecollaborative.org

What is the IPEC?

From the IPEC website (retrieved 9/12/13)

What is Interprofessional Education (IPE)?

“Interprofessional education occurs when students from two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes. Once students understand how to work interprofessionally, they are ready to enter the workplace as a member of the collaborative practice team. This is a key step in moving health systems from fragmentation to a position of strength.”

Source: World Health Organization (WHO). (2010). Framework for action on interprofessional education & collaborative practice. Geneva: World Health Organization.
See http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2010/WHO_HRH_HPN_10.3_eng.pdf.

About the Interprofessional Education Collaboration (IPEC)

In 2009 six national education associations of schools of the health professions formed a collaborative to promote and encourage constituent efforts that would advance substantive interprofessional learning experiences to help prepare future clinicians for team-based care of patients. These organizations that represent higher education in allopathic and osteopathic medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and public health would come to create core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice that can guide curricula development at all health professions schools.

Although the panel focused its recommendations on the professions of medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and public health, the IPEC hopes to engage other health professions with the release of its final report.

back to top