IN FOCUS Research

Aguilar-RodriguezAzizBergerDenton-BorhaugFischlerHaddad HusicLempaOlsonMayerRadineReynoldsSt. JohnWeilWest

 

Faculty Experts

Sandra Aguilar-Rodriguez
Dr. Sandra Aguilar-Rodríguez teaches Latin American history at Moravian College.  Currently she is working on a book manuscript tentatively entitled Cooking Modernity: Food, Gender, and Class in 1940s and 1950s Mexico, which situates women, the kitchen, and food at the forefront of the modernization process. This work examines how education, public policy, the mass media, migration, and industrialization have transformed eating and consumption patterns over time across social classes. Dr. Aguilar's research explores how poverty and inequality impacted on cooking and eating habits, as well as the discourse behind both nutrition policy and publicity campaigns extolling the consumption patterns and values of the middle class. Her work has been published in various journals, both in the United States and Latin America. Dr. Aguilar just published an article the last issue of the Radical History Review in which she analyzes cow's milk consumption in 1940s and 1950s Mexico. She also has a book chapter on domestic technology under review.

back to top

Sonia Aziz
Dr. Aziz's research focuses on valuation of health and other non-market goods (environmental goods) by looking at human behavior in response to potential health and environmental risks, and the impact of that behavior on the outcomes experienced. She is particularly interested in risk mitigating actions taken by individuals in highly resource constrained economies and most of her field work is based in developing countries.

back to top

Jane Berger
Dr. Berger’s research focuses on the historical causes of late-twentieth century urban poverty in the United States.  She also studies comparatively the causes of American urban poverty and poverty in developing nations.  Currently she is working on a book that explores ways that changes in public-sector employment and the availability of welfare services during the second half of the twentieth century impacted urban African-American women’s economic security.  Her work on this topic has appeared in International Labor and Working-Class History.  Her dissertation on the topic won the Organization of American Historians’ Lerner-Scott Prize.

back to top

Kelly Denton-Borhaug

Dr. Denton-Borhaug's areas of work: atonement theology in Christianity; Jewish and Christian feminism; Christian ethics and war; Christian atonement and popular culture, war-culture and political theology

back to top

Lisa Fischler
Dr. Fischler's work involves women and politics in China, comparative women's movements in East Asia, state and society in China, feminist theory, women's studies, comparative regime change, politics and culture in Chinese societies, and political transitions.

back to top

Khristina Haddad
Dr. Haddad’s research involves history of political thought and contemporary political thinking with a particular emphasis on the work of the German thinker Hannah Arendt and ideas of time and temporality.  Secondary areas of study include feminist theory and gender studies as well as the politics of women's health

back to top

Diane Husic
Dr. Husic’s scholarship includes citizen science and conservation and poverty and environmental justices in the context of climate change. During the last year she traveled to Mexico, Ecuador and Costa Rica and discussed climate change with a variety of indigenous peoples.  In 2009, Dr. Husic attended the UN Climate Change Convention in Copenhagen (COP15) as a civil society observer and subsequently has been asked to serve on the PA Adaptation to Climate Change Working Group for Natural Resources. As a part of her Audubon fellowship, Dr. Husic is working with a group of scholars who are trying to understand the relative exclusion of people of color from conservation and nature-based activities (e.g. birding).

back to top 

Heikki Lempa
Dr. Lempa’s work is on the social and cultural history of Germany, 1700-1945. His first book, Bildung der Triebe. Der deutsche Philanthropismus (1768-1788) (1993) is a study of 18th century German education.. A recent book, Beyond the Gymnasium. Educating the Middle-Class Bodies in Classical Germany (2007) explores the practices of the body, especially gymnastics, dancing, walking, and medicine. He is currently working on a project that probes the ways honor practices changed in Germany between 1700 and 1914. In support of an increasing body of scholarship showing that the nobility did not have a monopoly on honor, Lempa’s recent work has focused on journeymen workers in Leipzig, Germany and their sense of personal and collective honor. He argues that numerous strikes since the 1880’s illustrate the journeymen's collective pride in work, a clear sense of deserved salary as well as desired form of recognition. His work attempts to show the implicit connection between honor and poverty, where honor culture had the potential of giving workers the opportunity to preserve their personal dignity in their economic misery.

back to top

Gary Olson
Dr. Olson's areas of interest include international political economy, labor politics and U.S. foreign policy in the Third World.

back to top

Robert Mayer

back to top

Jason Radine
Dr. Radine has written about poverty and inequality as historical social realities as well as their uses in political rhetoric in his studies of the biblical prophetic book of Amos.  In his research, he has examined how economic inequalities between nations (ancient Israel and Judah) and consequent feelings of resentment can be addressed in biblical literature in the form of ethical indictments as a way to "explain" the disastrous end of the ancient kingdom of Israel.  In his classroom teaching, he also addresses issues of poverty through the Jewish and Christian Bibles, and in ancient Near Eastern history.

back to top

John Reynolds
Dr. Reynolds' areas of work include American government, public policy development and administration, popular culture, energy policy and social policy pertaining to families and children.

back to top

Donald St. John
Dr. St. John’s areas of expertise include religions of Asia, Native American religions, religion and ecology, and contemporary spirituality (religious and nonreligious). His interests include Asian and Native American religions; the interaction of science and religion, particularly religion and the ecology; and contemporary spirituality (religious and nonreligious).

Gordon Weil

back to top

James West
Dr. West's areas of work include international and development economics; issues in business and society and international management. Dr. West has worked and conducted research in India, China, Japan, Western and Central Europe, the Middle East and Brazil. He has worked as a consultant with foundations, business and government organizations.

back to top