Physics Department of Moravian College, Bethlehem, PA Moravian College
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[ Note: all information below is taken from the 2008-2010 Moravian College Course Catalog. If you would like more up-to-date information, see the current Course Catalog, or contact Kelly Krieble. ]

109-110. Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences.
Aspects of physics important in biological processes and health sciences. Major topics in the first term include elementary mechanics, biomechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, and metabolism. Second-term topics include electromagnetism, bioelectricity, membrane transport, waves, geometrical optics, and radiation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 106-166 or 170. Four 50-minute or three 70-minute lectures, one 3-hour laboratory. (F4) Krieble, Roeder

111-112. Introductory Physics.
First term treats mechanics, heat, and wave phenomena. Second term treats electricity, magnetism, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Co-requisites: Mathematics 170 and 171. Three 50-minute lectures, one 50-minute problem session, one 3-hour laboratory. (F4) Krieble, Powlette

217. Digital Electronics and Microprocessors. (Also Computer Science 217)
Laboratory-oriented course in computer hardware for science, mathematics, and computer-science students. Topics include logic gates, Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential logic circuits, register-transfer logic, microprocessors, addressing modes, programming concepts, microcomputer system confi guration, and interfacing. Three 50-minute periods, two 3-hour laboratories. Staff

221. Linear Electronics.
A laboratory-oriented course in electronics stressing applications of linear integrated circuits to laboratory measurement in physics, chemistry, and biology. Laboratory experiments and lecture-discussions include circuit analysis, system design using operational amplifi ers, analog computer systems, transistors, power supplies, oscillators, Butterworth response filters, and phase-locked loops. Prerequisite: Physics 109-110 or 111-112 or permission of instructor. Fall. Three 50-minute lectures, two 3-hour laboratories. Powlette

222. Modern Physics. [ images of experiments ]
Concepts leading to breakdown of classical physics and emergence of quantum theory. Topics include atomic physics, relativity and four-vector space-time physics, solid-state physics, nuclear physics, and elementary particles. Independent laboratory experiments (e.g., Compton effect, electron spin resonance, electron diffraction, Mössbauer effect) complement student’s interest and needs. Prerequisites: Physics 111-112 and Mathematics 171 or permission of instructor. Spring. Three 50-minute lectures, one 50-minute problem session, one 3-hour laboratory. Writing-intensive. Krieble, Powlette

331-332. Mechanics.
First term treats motion of a single particle with emphasis on conservative forces and their properties, central force fields, and oscillatory motions. Second term treats motion of the system of particles, rigid body mechanics, accelerated reference systems, and mechanics (Lagrange and Hamilton). Emphasis on computer solutions of problems. Prerequisites: Physics 111-112 and Mathematics 211 or permission of instructor. Alternate years. Four 50-minute lectures or three 70-minute lectures. Roeder

333. Physical Optics. [ images of experiments ]
Theoretical and experimental study of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter. Topics include wave and photon representations of light, geometrical optics, polarization, interference, and diffraction phenomena. Selected topics in modern optics include gas and semiconductor lasers, electro-optics, nonlinear optics, and fiber optics. Standard laboratory experiments include interfero-metry and diffraction. Application-based experiments include laser construction, holography, photo-refractive nonlinear optics, dynamic diffractive optics, and fiber optics. Prerequisites: Physics 111-112 and Mathematics 211 or permission of instructor. Alternate years. Three 50-minute lectures, one 3-hour laboratory. Powlette

334. Thermal Physics.
Unified treatment of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Topics include laws of thermodynamics, state functions and variables, application to physical and chemical systems, kinetic theory, distribution functions, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics, black-body radiation, and Debye theory of specific heats. Prerequisites: Physics 111-112 and Mathematics 211 or permission of instructor. Alternate years. Three 50-minute lectures, one 3-hour laboratory. Krieble

341. Quantum Mechanics.
Fourier transforms, wave packets, Schrödinger’s equation, square-well and barrier potentials, the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, atomicspectra, multi-electron atoms, algebraic methods, matrix mechanics, perturbation theory. Prerequisites: Physics 222 and Mathematics 221 or permission of instructor. Alternate years. Three 50-minute lectures, one 50-minute problem session, one 3-hour laboratory. Krieble

342. Nuclear Physics.
Properties of nuclei, the deuteron, partial-wave analysis; alpha, beta, and gamma decay; nuclear models, fission, fusion, nuclear reactions, properties of elementary particles, classification schemes, interactions. Prerequisites: Physics 341 and Mathematics 221 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. Three 50-minute lectures. Powlette

343. Introduction to Mathematical Physics.
Mathematical techniques for solving ordinary and partial differential equations that arise in theoretical physics. Topics include series solutions, special functions, operational methods, boundary-value problems, orthogonal functions, product solutions, and/or selected topics determined by needs of students and interest of instructor. Prerequisites: At least one year of college physics and Mathematics 221. Alternate years. Three 50-minute lectures. Roeder

344. Solid-State Physics.
Fundamental study of matter in the solid state, including periodic arrays of atoms, fundamental types of lattices, position and orientation of planes in crystals, simple crystal structures, reciprocal lattices, Brillouin zones, crystals of inert gases, ionic crystals, covalent crystals, hydrogen bonding, phonons and lattice vibrations, lattice heat capacities, diffusion, free-electron gas, energy bands, and point defects. Prerequisites: Mathematics 211 or equivalent. A course in modern atomic physics is recommended. Alternate years. Three 50-minute lectures, one 50-minute problem session. Powlette, Roeder

345-346. Electric and Magnetic Fields. [ images of experiments ]
Field concepts, electromagnetic theory, and electromagnetic waves. First term treats electrostatics, steady fields and currents, and electromagnetism. Second term treats time-varying fields and currents, Maxwell’s equations, and electromagnetic waves. Prerequisites: Physics 111-112 and Mathematics 211 or permission of instructor. Alternate years. Three 50-minute lectures, one 3-hour laboratory. Krieble

370. Physics Seminar.
Selected topics in theoretical and/or experimental physics. Choice of topics determined by needs of students and interest of instructor. Alternate years. Lecture and/or laboratory hours depend on topics. Staff

190-199, 290-299, 390-399. Special Topics.

381-384. Independent Study.
Independent study provides students with an opportunity to undertake a program of supervised reading and research not normally provided within existing courses. To be eligible for Independent study, a student must have junior or senior standing with a cumulative quality point average of at least 2.70.

386-388. Field Study.
Field study is an opportunity for off-campus work, study, or both. Field study may be undertaken on full-time or part-time basis and may assume the form of volunteer work or internships in public or private agencies, institutes or businesses. To be eligible for Field study, a student must have junior or senior standing with a cumulative quality point average of at least 2.70.

400-401. Honors.
The purpose of the Honors program is to offer qualified seniors the opportunity to work on a year long independent, intensive research project on a specific topic of their choice. The student works under the guidance of a faculty member who serves as the Honors project advisor. Upon successful completion of the Honors program the student receives credit for the equivalent of two courses, and his or her degree carries a citation of Honors in the field of research.

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