Sample Lesson Plan: Parts of a Plant

I. OVERVIEW OF THE LESSON

A. Tuesday, April 10, 2007

B. 40 Minutes: 10 for Introduction; 5 for Book; 20 for Craft; 5 for Closing Song

C. Group Structures: Groups of 6 for observation and craft; Whole group for read aloud and closing song.

D. Lesson Topic: Parts of a Plant

E. Kindergarten

F. Mrs. D’Emilio

 

II. PENNSYLVANIA STATE STANDARDS

3.1.A. Identify and describe what parts make up a whole.

3.2.C. Connect known ideas with new knowledge to build understanding or refine concepts.

 

III. GENERAL OBJECTIVE

Students will understand that plants have four main parts: roots, stems, leaves, and flowers. They will explore these concepts through observation and construction of a plant.

 

IV. BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVE

After creating a list of what we already know about plants and reading the story Seeds Grow! with the whole class, students will make their own plant and label the four appropriate parts accurately.

Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Application

 

V. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

1. At least 4 class plants

2. Seeds Grow! By Angela Shelf Madearis

3. White or oatmeal colored construction paper (8 1⁄2 x 11 inch size),  1 sheet for each student

4. 2 small green squares for each student to cut out their leaves

5. 1 precut stem per student

6. Markers, 1 basket per table, with lots of brown to draw roots

7. Large poster with assembly directions for students

8. Small white rectangles for students to label plant parts, 4 per student

9. Scissors

10. Glue

11. Pencils

12. Samples of preconstructed crafts to be used as models

 

VI. ACTIVITY AND PROCEDURE

A. MOTIVATION AND INTRODUCTION

The class will begin with students seated at their colored tables, where they will explore and discuss what they already know about plants with their groups. After a few minutes, the class will compile a list of what we already know about plants, thus activating prior knowledge. Then we will complete the introduction by reading Seeds Grow! By Angela Shelf Madearis. Students will be asked periodically to make predictions and to connect the plant facts we discussed in the introduction with the text.

 

B. DEVELOPMENT

After students have activated prior knowledge and read the story, they will make their own plants. They will get precut stems, markers to draw the roots, squares to cut out leaves, and colored paper to make their flower blossom. Students will have two types of flowers to choose from to model their flower after: poppies or tulips. Then when the plant is assembled and glued onto the paper, students will use the small white rectangles to neatly print each part of the plant. Then they will place the labels in the appropriate places on the roots, leaves, stem, and flower.

C. STRATEGIES FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS

There will be pictures and visual cues on the directions sheet so students who aren’t advanced readers can still follow the directions. I will also create a model of each type of flower so the students will know what they are able to make. If children are going to have trouble cutting out their leaves, I could precut or predraw the leaves or flowers so they would need to cut them out and then put everything together themselves. This would preserve their independence on the project, but they would get the help they needed.

D. SUMMARY AND CLOSURE

The whole class will gather on the carpet to sing a closing song to wrap up the lesson.

 

Little Seed (Tune: I’m a Little Teapot)

Here’s a little seed in the dark, dark ground.

Out comes the warm sun, yellow and round.

Down comes the rain, wet and slow.

Up comes the little seed, grow, grow, grow!

E. ASSIGNMENT

None

VII. EVALUATION

A. ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed on their participation and effort in the group discussion, and how accurately they put together and label their plant.

 

B. SELF REFLECTION

Overall, I think the lesson took a little longer than I expected.  Some students finished putting together at or under the 20 minute mark, however, there were quite a few students who took almost 30 minutes to assemble and label their plant.

 

One thing that I think worked really well was the live plants that I brought in for the introductory observations. The students really got a multi-sensory learning experience that helped them to relate better.  This also helped get their brains motivated and working at the beginning of the lesson, and it helped give the students ideas about what we already knew about plants.  The students really enjoyed the song we learned, and this can be used to relate future lessons.

 

One thing that I didn’t really explain clearly to the students was that they should draw their leaves and flower before cutting them out. They also didn’t use the whole piece of paper; most made their leaves and flowers tiny, which didn’t turn out proportionate to the rest of their plant. I should have told them to draw out their parts first, and then cut them out. 
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