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English Lesson Plans

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OVERVIEW OF LESSON

    •    10/21/13

    •    45 minutes

    •    Miss Ashley Smith

    •    Grade Level: 7th Grade


I. BIG IDEA

  1. Students will critically think about the effects of the Holocaust on the Jewish people and analyze the history of the Holocaust and World War II and the morals found in the story “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.”


II. GENERAL OBJECTIVES:

  1. Students are going to take their previous knowledge of the Holocaust and use that to evaluate how they would feel if they were forced to leave their homes. Then students will learn through visuals, class and small group discussions, and independent work vocabulary needed to study the Holocaust and students will start to think critically about what they’ve learned in class to try and pre think what “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” is about. By the end of the class students should be able to know:

1. The Jewish people were forced to move from their homes to unknown locations during the Holocaust


2. Background History of the Holocaust


3. How to use this information to try and think about what “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” is about


III. STANDARDS

    E07.B-K.1.1.3: Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, how individuals influence ideas or events).


    E07.E.1.1.1: Introduce text(s) for the intended audience, state an opinion and/or topic, establish a situation, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose..


IV. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  1. Why is it important to learn about the Holocaust?

  2. How can literature affect our morals?

  3. How can one apply what they’ve learned from history to the present?


   

V. BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Students evaluate how it would be like if they were forced to move somewhere where they didn’t know where they were going and how the Jewish people would have felt during this time.

  2. Students will analyze the history and effects of the Holocaust.

  3. Students will make inferences about literary terms and their definitions.

  4. Students will make inferences through previous knowledge and class discussion about what the class novel is about.

   

VI. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. Suitcase

  2. Computer/Educational Video: http://www.ushmm.org/remember/days-of-remembrance/about-days-of-remembrance/why-we-remember-the-holocaust

  3. Paper

  4. Pens

  5. Vocabulary Worksheet

  6. Story Knowledge Worksheet

               

VII. VOCABULARY

  1. Nazi

  2. Holocaust

  3. Swastika

  4. Ghetto

  5. Concentration Camp

  6. Genocide

  7. Aryan Race

  8. Racism

  9. Semitism

  10. Prejudice


VIII. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES:

a.) Warm Up (5 min)

  1. The teacher will start the class by having a warm up on the board asking students to write down what they already know about the Holocaust.

  2. After two minutes of writing the teacher will call on students and students should mention things like concentration camps, Nazis, World War II, etc.

  3. Then the teacher will explain that they will start a novel that takes place during the Holocaust and that before they start students need a bit of background information.


b) Suitcase Writing  (10 min)

  1. Then the teacher will then show students a suitcase and tell students to pretend that they have arrived home and their parents have told them that they are moving. They don’t know where they’re going or how long they will be gone. The teacher will tell students they have two minutes to write what they would bring.

  2. After the two minutes the teacher will ask students what they would bring. Students should mention food, clothes, pets, etc.

  3. The teacher will explain that Jewish people were put in the situation. That the Nazis told them that they were moving and that the Jewish people were told they had no idea where they were going or for how long.

  4. The teacher will then ask students how they would feel if they were put in this situation. Students should say they would feel stressed, sad, or confused.

  5. The teacher will explain that the Jewish people had to feel this way and this was just part of what they had to go through and to keep this in mind as they read the story.

c ). Educational Video  (7 min)

  1. The teacher will then show students a short educational video about the Holocaust with the subtitles on, so that students with all kinds of learning styles can learn about the Holocaust.

  2. The teacher will then ask students what they learned from the video or any thoughts about the video.


d.) Anticipation Guide (15 min)

    1. The teacher will then say that before they start reading the story they will fill out an anticipation guide, so that they can start to understand what lessons they will learn about the story and this will help students with IEP take steps to starting to understand what the novel is about.

    2. Once students have filled out their guide the teacher will review their answers and justifications and then explain that all these lessons apply to the story and they should keep these questions in mind as they read the story.


e). Wrap Up (8 min)

  1. The teacher will ask if the students if they have any questions about the class.

  2. The teacher will assign homework.

  3. Then the teacher will have students write an exit slip stating one new thing they learned about the Holocaust.


IX. HOMEWORK: The teacher will tell students based off of their previous knowledge and class discussion to try and write what they think is the best definition for various terms relating to the novel.


X. ASSESSMENT: The student’s competency of the anticipation guide, student participation during class discussions, the student’s answers to the exit slip, homework, and future projects.

XI. REFLECTION AND SELF EVALUATION

XII. STRATEGIES FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS

    a.) Spoken and written examples of what is involved with the Holocaust during the warm up.

    b.) Actual suitcase for visual assistance during the class game and then written and spoken descriptions of the game.

    c.) Video with subtitles so that students have visual and written descriptions of the Holocaust.

    d.) Anticipation guide so that IEP students can take steps to learn what the story is through written and spoken discussion.




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Science Lesson Plans

science

OVERVIEW OF LESSON

9/04/13

15 minutes

Miss Ashley Smith

Grade Level: College


I. BIG IDEA

  1. Students learn how fish adapt using their basic characteristics to different kinds of sea levels. Students will learn about these adaptations through examining the three different kinds of light zones and bioluminescence and then making evaluations about how fish use light through a class project and work sheet. This will teach students how the environment influences one’s development


II. CONCEPT:

  1. Students are going to take their knowledge of the basics of fish that they already know and then apply that knowledge to learn about how fish use these characteristics to adapt to different environments. By the end of the class students should be able to know:

1. What light zones fish live in


2. How fish use their basic characteristics to not only survive in different temperatures, but to survive in deep, dark waters.


3. The importance of adaptation and environment in our development.


III. STANDARDS

a) BIO.B.3.1.2: Describe the factors that can contribute to the development of new species (e.g., isolating mechanisms, genetic drift, founder effect, migration).


IV. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  1. How does adaptation effect our lives?

  2. How do fish adapt in order to live in these different kinds of habitats?

  3. How does the environment affect our development?


V. BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Students will make inferences about what it would be like to live at the bottom of the ocean and what an animal would have to do in order to survive in that kind of habitat.

  2. Students will evaluate how the environment affects how creatures live.

  3. Students will analyze how marine animals cope in such dark circumstances.

VI. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. Yardstick

  2. Markers

  3. Paper

  4. Adaptation worksheet

  5. Bioluminescent fish examples

  6. Ocean Layer Worksheet

VII. VOCABULARY

  1. Photic Zone

  2. Twilight Zone

  3. Aphotic Zone

  4. Bioluminescence


VIII. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES:

a.) Warm Up (5 min)

  1. The teacher will start the class by asking students to name the characteristics of fish and the teacher will write their answers on the board.

  2. The teacher will tell students that fish use their characteristics in order to survive in various habitats.

  3. The teacher will say that fish are different because there are different levels of the ocean and the teacher will show students a yardstick and show that the ocean is 11,000 yardsticks deep and therefore there would be different fish at different depths.

  4. Then the teacher will explain that there are three different light zones and the teacher will hand out a take home so that students can get a visual of the zones.


b) Fish in Different Levels (3 min)

  1. The teacher will have students name what characteristics the fish will have at the different zones. Students should mention light, color, size, and teeth.  

  2. The teacher will explain that fish in the Photic zone tend to be colorful, more common, and there is more plantlife. Fish in the Twilight zone are big eyed, large toothed, and can handle colder water, and fish in the Photic zone large, ferocious, or small and blob like.

  3. The teacher will write these characteristics on the board so that the students can see these characteristics visually.

  4. The teacher will then hand out examples of bioluminescent fish so that students can get an example deeper level fish.

c ). Individual Adaptation Worksheet (5 min)

  1. Students will be told to imagine they are scientists doing an experiment where they have removed an Angler Fish’s bioluminescent light.

  2. Students will create a plan where they form an idea about how they think the Angler Fish will adapt, where the Angler Fish will live, and if the Angler Fish will survive or not. This will help the teacher assess how much students understand about adaptation and the different ocean levels.

  3. Students will then be told to draw their adapted Angler Fish so that students can visually learn about adaptation and so the teacher can assess the students grasp of adaptation.

  4. If there is time a few students will then be called on to describe their experiment and  picture.The class will discuss the student’s answers and pictures so that the class can get a wrap up of the lesson.

d). Wrap Up (1 min)

  1. The teacher will ask if the students if they have any questions about the class.

  2. The teacher will have the students write an exit slip stating what the three ocean levels are.

  3. Then the teacher would assign homework to the class


IX. HOMEWORK: The student will be told that they are to pretend they are moving to the desert, arctic, and jungle. Students should write a paragraph for each location describing how they would have to adapt in order to best survive in these different locations.


X. ASSESSMENT: The student’s competency and ease when completing the class worksheet and drawing, if students can accurately fill out the exit slip and class discussions.

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